Wavemakers Summit Volunteer Team

Ready for an inspiring day with Youth Wavemakers? Apply now to be an event volunteer and youth team mentor.

The Position: Event Volunteer and Team Mentor

Background: Annually, youth from Calgary and the surrounding area come together for a free day-long workshop to learn about global and local water and sanitation issues, and decide how they will make a difference. Youth spend the morning participating in workshop sessions, learning about the issues, and the afternoon developing action plans. They can receive $500 toward implementation of their action plans if their proposals are approved.

Purpose of the Role:

In this role you will assist the Youth Wavemakers program with the annual Wavemakers Summit on October 25th, 2018. The role involves set-up and tear down of the event space, assisting in two morning workshops, then working with a team in the afternoon to develop an action project. You may choose to continue working with this team throughout the year (please indicate if you are interested in mentoring a team in your application, as well as the areas of the city you are willing to work in).

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Direct small group youth activities
  • Help youth to understand different types of action, and how they can impact their communities and the world
  • Set-up and tear-down of the event space
  • Working with a school team throughout the day (can extend to the rest of the school year) to plan an action project with is youth driven
  • Attend an evening training session on Thursday October 18th 6:30-8pm

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Comfortable working with youth in small groups
  • Interest in taking action ,and willingness to learn ways to guiding youth to create an informed action plan
  • Attention to detail

Orientation and Training: Orientation is required for this role. Orientation session will be held on Thursday October 18th 6:30-8pm at the CAWST Office (B12, 6020 2 Street SE, Calghary, AB, T2H 2L8)

Location & Timing: The Wavemakers Summit is held October 25 at the Downtown Campus of the University of Calgary, 906 – 8th Ave SW

Time Requirements: 

1.5 hour orientation session on Thursday October 18th
8am-4pm at Summit on Thursday October 25th (times can be flexible!)

Department and Supervision: Wavemakers Program Manager

Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you wish to apply for this volunteer position, please contact Tori D’Avella at tdavella@cawst.org with the title of the Volunteer Position you are applying for in the subject line.

If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form, so we can get you started!

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers. We also host a regular volunteer night. 

Director, Business Operations

Join CAWST as a Director, Business Operations and lead a dynamic and collaborative team to deliver on our vision and mission.

Join CAWST as a Director, Business Operations and lead a dynamic and collaborative team to deliver on our vision and mission.

The Position: Director, Business Operations

Reports to: CEO

Type: Full time, permanent

Position start date: As soon as possible

Application due date: Applications will be reviewed as they are received and will continue to be accepted until the position is filled

 

Position Summary

CAWST’s Director, Business Operations provides strategic leadership, direction and support for CAWST’s business systems. This position leads their Department team and works closely with the rest of the leadership team and staff to deliver on CAWST’s vision and mission.

The Director, Business Operations is responsible for the management of the CAWST’s finances and accounting, human resources administration, information and communications technology (ICT), business processes, office management, governance, compliance, and administration.

The Director, Business Operations applies a business management and administration approach to CAWST’s hybrid business model. CAWST is a not-for-profit organization, both a licensed professional engineering consultancy and a registered Canadian charity. This position develops business and financial strategies, monitors financial and human resources, and provides analysis and recommendations to the leadership team and Board of Directors for organizational decisions. This position establishes, maintains, and streamlines CAWST’s business processes to maximize CAWST’s effectiveness and improve performance. This position has a key role in supporting the implementation of CAWST’s new organization structure and multi-teaming approach, which is highly interdependent across departments, roles, projects, clients, and collaborators.

This position includes direct reports to execute on the duties and responsibilities of the team. These include CAWST’s Accounting Manager, Financial Analyst, Manager Information Communication Technology, Systems Analyst, HR Analyst, and Office Manager.

This position is typically elected as CAWST Board of Directors’ Treasurer.

 

Responsibilities

  • Provide leadership to their team, including coaching and performance management
  • Implement business strategies and plans to align with CAWST’s goals, and measure progress toward these goals
  • Gather, analyze and interpret internal and external data and make recommendations for organizational decisions
  • Lead the development of and manage CAWST’s annual organizational budget
  • Create and manage the department’s annual operations plans and budget
  • Assist the Leadership team in preparing and monitoring department and project budgets, financial reports, and financial plan
  • Monitor CAWST’s resources to ensure that it has adequate and appropriate resources to complete its activities (eg., people, IT, materials, equipment)
  • Ensure accountability and the consistent implementation of CAWST’s policies and procedures, and report on compliance
  • Identify and mitigate corporate risks and liabilities
  • Lead organizational compliance with regulatory, legal, and other areas as it relates to CAWST
  • Keep up to date with relevant legal developments, which impact CAWST (e.g. employment law)
  • Manage CAWST’s financial reserves
  • Ensure appropriate financial controls, systems and processes are in place and are being followed; and accounting practices are in accordance with recognized accounting principles
  • Maintain relationships with landlord, vendors, and suppliers

 

Expectations

  • Rigorous stewardship of CAWST’s finances
  • Maintaining relationship with landlord and overall responsibility for the proper functioning of CAWST office
  • Friendly, efficient, service to other departments
  • Development of CAWST’s ICT software and hardware systems
  • Development of CAWST business processes and systems to enable effective and efficient project management and reporting
  • Monitoring compliance with all legal and board governance requirements including distribution of required documents to the board
  • Facilitation of the transfer of CAWST business systems to CAWST partners when required

 

Education

  • Bachelor’s degree in business, engineering, economics, computer science or relevant discipline (and/or equivalent relevant experience). Masters Business Administration preferred.

 

Experience

  • Proven work experience as a business manager or related role
  • Prior experience with strategic planning, finance, accounting, ICT systems development, contract management, and communications
  • Significant work experience with Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook)
  • Knowledge of charity law, accounting standards, employment standards, and governance an asset
  • Experience with web-based content management systems, databases, resource management systems, and knowledge management systems an asset

Skills and Attributes

  • Passion and commitment for CAWST’s vision and mission
  • Credible: establishes effective working relationships with staff, board members, suppliers, and other stakeholders
  • Organisational and time management skills: able to handle multiple tasks within multiple projects, balance and negotiate priorities in a multi-functional role, handle conflicting demands, and meet tight deadlines
  • Strong communicator: able to translate financial and other data into easy to understand management information; written and oral English required, other languages an asset
  • Analytical and problem solving: solutions oriented; able to quickly troubleshoot problems effectively, often with limited resources; strong aptitude for numbers and financial reports
  • Reliable: able to follow through with commitments and execute plans efficiently and effectively
  • Decision making: knows when to make a decision and when to involve others or escalate; able to make professional and timely decisions in a fast-paced environment; able to think both strategically while also paying attention to the administrative details
  • Team player: an accomplished professional who can work well both independently and within a team; comfortable both leading and following direction
  • Values and vision: match with CAWST’s vision, mission and values

 

Compensation

These matters will be discussed in a personal interview.

 

Eligibility

You must be legally able to work in Canada.


To Apply

Please send your cover letter, resume, and answers to the questionnaire below to cawstHR@cawst.org. Position will be open until filled. No phone calls please. Only those granted an interview will be contacted.

 

Questionnaire

Please answer all questions to the best of your ability. Be as specific as possible, use examples from past work experience, and try to keep each answer under half a page.

Send your completed questionnaire to cawstHR@cawst.org.

  1. What has motivated you to consider this position at CAWST?
  2. What excites you the most about this role?
  3. What do you believe will be the biggest challenge for you?
  4. Of your work experience, what do you believe is most relevant to the Director Business Operations role with CAWST?
  5. What are your career goals and aspirations? Where do you see yourself in five years?

 


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that clean water changes lives. Safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST believes that the place to start is to teach people the skills they need to have safe water in their homes. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in developing countries through education, training and consulting services. This ever-expanding network can motivate individual households to take action to meet their own water and sanitation needs. Since 2001, CAWST’s client network has expanded to 5,000 organizations worldwide. Together, we are helping millions of people get better water or sanitation.

Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

CAWST Transcribers

Are you a super-fast typer who is keen to learn more about our work with clients? Consider transcribing for CAWST! This position is flexible and can be done remotely.

The Position: CAWST Transcriber

Purpose of the Role:

To complete various transcriptions on an ongoing basis of video or audio files to make it usable as education or communication material. Great way to learn more about our work and relationships with our clients internationally.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Have a brief orientation with a CAWST team member
  • Complete transcription from audio or video file to written text in a word document
  • Use our template
  • Share your interpretation of the material and be willing to answer questions about what you transcribed

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Excellent listener
  • Proficient in typing on a computer
  • Passion to help CAWST develop materials for education and training
  • Organized and reliable

 

Location & Timing: This role can be done remotely or in office in Calgary. Time depends on the length of recordings. Often recordings are 1-2 hours in length, so they may take up to 4-5 hours to transcribe.

Department and Supervision:

Education Program Development or Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives depending on transcription needs.


Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, please contact the Volunteer Program Coordinator, Tori D’Avella, at volunteers@cawst.org or 403-681-6220.

If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form.

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers. We also host a regular volunteer night. 

See you at World Water Week 2018

We’re looking forward to participating in World Water Week again this year. Will you be there? Let’s connect!

CAWST at World Water Week

Let’s connect in Stockholm!

CAWST will be in Stockholm from Saturday August 25 to Friday August 31 for World Water Week activities and the SuSanA (Sustainable Sanitation Alliance) meetings.

Will you be there? Get in touch, let us know what you’re up to. We will be connecting with colleagues to share knowledge and leverage each other’s work in WASH.

The CAWST team traveling to Stockholm will include:

 

What we’ll be doing

  • Sat, Aug 25 |  Presenting at the 26th SuSanA Meeting. Off-site event
  • Sun, Aug 26 | Co-facilitating the SuSanA Capacity Development Working Group (WG1 Meeting). Open side event: SEI, 10-11:30 am. Join us!
  • Mon, Aug 27 | Hosting the annual “Canada Contingent” networking event. Open off-site event: BarCelona Tapas Bar, 5:30-7:30 pm. Join us!
  • Thu, Aug 30 | Co-convening an event with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, BORDA, and the Asian Development Bank:  “Solving the capacity gap to scale non-sewered and decentralized sanitation”,
    2-3:30 pm , Room FH 300
  • Throughout the week | Strategic meetings with partners and prospects with a shared interest in closing the WASH capacity gap. Ahead of the conference, get in touch with either Millie or Sterenn via email. For on-site connections, catch us on WhatsApp.

 

Why Capacity Development?

Because it’s how you get knowledge to the people who will make use of it.

See how CAWST is addressing WASH capacity development. These case studies show how CAWST helps.


Get to know Millie and Sterenn

Millie Adam is the Director of International Partnerships at CAWST. She draws on her background in water and wastewater engineering, corporate social responsibility, and international development to advance CAWST’s vision. Her experience includes corporate social responsibility, design, construction and commissioning of industrial and municipal water treatment systems worldwide; as well as environmental health in India. Millie has spent over 10 years in the international development sector and has worked in India, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, Mexico and the Caribbean. Millie has a BSc in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Calgary. You can reach Millie at madam@cawst.org.

Sterenn Philippe is an Education Program Developer – Sanitation Specialist on the Research & Learning team at CAWST. She holds an MSc Water and Environmental Management from WEDC, Loughborough University and a BSc in Environmental Sciences focused on water resources from the University of Southampton. Before joining CAWST, she worked as a water consultant in French Guyana on WASH projects with isolated communities in the Amazon. She also has worked on WASH and engineering projects in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Passionate about sanitation, particularly fecal sludge management, Sterenn co-leads Working Group 1 on Capacity Development at the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA). She is fluent in English and French. You can reach Sterenn at sphillippe@cawst.org.

Human Resources Analyst

Join our Business Services team and contribute to building on a dynamic and collaborative organization, to deliver on our vision and mission!

Join the CAWST team and apply your Human Resources expertise to building on a dynamic and collaborative organization, to deliver on our vision and mission!

The Position: Human Resources Analyst

Reports to: Director, Business Services

Type: Full time, permanent

Position start date: As soon as possible

Application due date: Applications will be reviewed as they are received and will continue to be accepted until the position is filled

 

Position Summary

The Human Resource (HR) Analyst contributes to building a dynamic and collaborative organization, to deliver on CAWST’s vision and mission. The HR Analyst is responsible for the operational and administrative functions of Human Resources within CAWST. Functional responsibilities under the role of the HR Analyst include employment opportunities, recruitment and onboarding, employee relations, compensation and benefits, organizational development, retention, and maintenance of immigration and work permits.

 

Responsibilities

The key responsibilities of the Human Resources Analyst are as follows:

  • Administer semi-monthly payroll through third party vendor
  • Review and update, when necessary, CAWST’s Human Resources Policies and Procedures
  • Report on compliance of CAWST’s Human Resources Policies and Procedures
  • Create reporting for CAWST’s HR Committee meetings
  • Maintain human resource information and employee records, including all documentation to ensure staff are legally entitled to work in Canada
  • Track employee immigration status and work with Immigration Consultants and staff to ensure work permits are tracked and renewed
  • Stay apprised of legal and regulatory changes, as it relates to employment law, and help implement changes to Policies or Procedures, when needed
  • Maintain current knowledge of human resources market trends, industry standards, and best practices
  • Manage CAWST’s recruitment, including, but not limited to:
    • Developing and maintaining network of prospective leads for recruitments
    • Developing job descriptions and job postings
    • Screening, evaluating and recommending applicants for interviews
    • Standardizing, based on best practices, and participating in interviews
    • Coordinating required paperwork
    • Conduct incoming and outgoing employee processes, including employee orientation
  • Act as liaison between Management and staff in order to facilitate actions to resolve employee issues and escalate them as appropriate
  • Review employee complaints and ensuring accurate and timely documentation of concerns or issues
  • Providing expertise and guidance to Directors across all human resource issues and specifically in addressing sensitive and complex employee relations matters
  • Administer and explain benefits to employees, serve as liaison between insurance carriers and employees
  • Ensure compensation and benefits are in line with company policies and legislation
  • Participate in CAWST’s Crisis Management Team and Occupational Health and Safety Committee
  • Other duties as assigned

 

Education

  • A degree or diploma in human resources management, business administration or equivalent, or
  • A degree with relevant experience

 

Skills and Attributes

  • 3 – 5 years of generalist human resources experience or similar
  • CHRP designation considered an asset
  • Experience in a consulting firm preferred. International and/or non-profit experience an asset
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently and collaboratively, problem solve, research to find information; creative and innovative nature; keen to work in a small organization, and willing to do all kinds of work from administrative tasks to strategic development
  • Judgment, trust, and knowing when to keep things confidential and when to escalate

To Apply

To apply, please email your cover letter and resume to recruiting@aboutstaffing.com.


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that clean water changes lives. Safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST believes that the place to start is to teach people the skills they need to have safe water in their homes. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in developing countries through education, training and consulting services. This ever-expanding network can motivate individual households to take action to meet their own water and sanitation needs. Since 2001, CAWST’s client network has expanded to 5,000 organizations worldwide. Together, we are helping millions of people get better water or sanitation.

Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

Full Stack Web Developer

Join the CAWST team and help build online tools, websites, and apps that have meaningful social impact! We are looking for a creative front-end developer who is passionate about making information easily accessible and interfaces easy to use. You work well in a team and are not scared of back-end code and APIs. You are the kind of person who reads all the UI/UX blogs and instinctively sees how to make a page or application more user-friendly.

Join the CAWST team and build websites, apps, and online tools that impact people around the world! We are looking for a creative Full Stack Web Developer who is passionate in making information easily accessible and interfaces easy to use. You work well both independently and within a team. You write solid code. You love refactoring, testing, and finding elegant solutions to everyday web challenges.

The Position: Full Stack Web Developer

Reports to: Director, Virtual Services

Type: One-year contract, with possibility of extension to a permanent position

Location: Calgary (Canada)

Position start date: As soon as possible

Application due date: August 5th, 2018 Extended: September, 1st, 2018

Position Summary

The Full Stack Web Developer will play a central role in the development and integration of CAWST web properties. This includes CAWST’s main website (cawst.org), the Wavemakers website (cawst.org/wavemakers), the Education and Training Resources website (cawst.org/resources), the Biosand Filter Knowledge Base (biosandfilters.info), the Household Water Treatment Knowledge Base (hwts.info) and other mobile and desktop apps.

  • Our stacks are constantly evolving, but currently include AngularJS, Vue, Express, Node, RethinkDB,  Firebase, and Postgres; we also use a handful of AWS services, and run our servers under Ubuntu on AWS EC2
  • We use Trello and Slack for project management and communication, and Adobe tools for visuals
  • We do testing with Karma and Mocha
  • The current web development team includes three Web Developers (two mostly front-end and one mostly back-end)

 

Responsibilities

  • Manage 1 to 3 projects (depending on the size of the project)
  • Contribute up and down the stack on the assigned projects
  • Draw on our content experts, graphics team, and other development team members and work with internal and external clients and collaborators

 

Education

  • Bachelor’s degree in software engineering, web design or similar field

 

Skills and Attributes

  • Excellent knowledge of HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript (ES 6+), Sass, AngularJS 1.x, Vue
  • Proficiency with development tools such as git, npm, gulp, and webpack
  • Solid familiarity with back-end frameworks, including databases, Node webservers, and APIs
  • Proven ability to write clean, readable, reusable code
  • Good judgment: able to handle multiple tasks and balance priorities with various stakeholders
  • Excellent project management skills: scoping, resourcing, time estimates, project team leading
  • Ability to think creatively about challenges, resolve issues, and seek support when necessary
  • Careful attention to detail
  • Work ethic: hard-working, self-motivated, and respectful toward others
  • Good written and verbal English skills

 

Compensation

Discussed in the personal interview.

 

Eligibility

You must be legally able to work in Canada.


To Apply

Please send your cover letter, resume, and answers to the questionnaire below to cawstHR@cawst.org. Position will be open until filled. No phone calls please. Only those granted an interview will be contacted.

 

Questionnaire

  1. What has motivated you to consider working at CAWST in this position?
  2. What are your long-term career goals and aspirations? Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
  3. Please attach or link samples of your work (visual and/or code), any public GitHub projects, etc.

 


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that clean water changes lives. Safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST believes that the place to start is to teach people the skills they need to have safe water in their homes. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in developing countries through education, training and consulting services. This ever-expanding network can motivate individual households to take action to meet their own water and sanitation needs. Since 2001, CAWST’s client network has expanded to 5,000 organizations worldwide. Together, we are helping millions of people get better water or sanitation.

Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

Designing a learning and decision support software: WashEm

Behind the scenes of developing software-based learning and decision support tools for WASH practitioners

CAWST has been working with Action Contre Faim (ACF) and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to improve handwashing practices in emergency settings. The objective is to equip emergency practitioners with the knowledge and tools to intervene rapidly and effectively on hygiene behaviour. We are currently developing learning tools and a software-based decision-making tool to aid in the design of rapid, evidence-based programs.

The idea

The idea is simple: develop a software-based decision support tool (also known as an “expert system”) to help emergency practitioners develop hygiene programs that are more evidence-based. WASH managers and the field staff would use rapid formative research methods to gather data within a few days and use the tool in the web and desktop software to get ideas and assistance to build more impactful hygiene programs. Simple right?

The challenge being addressed is that most hygiene programs in emergencies are not designed with context in mind, are not evidence-based and don’t take into account the behavioural determinants of the population. Therefore, they do not provide the behavioural change intended.

The team

Using over fifteen years of experience in designing education and training tools for WASH practitioners, CAWST has brought together a diverse team from its staff to transform the learnings from the research of LSHTM and ACF. The team includes:

  1. Learning Advisors who have education and training experience for global WASH practitioners – from national field level staff to WASH Advisors
  2. Instructional Designers who develop effective learning tools to make complex concepts accessible to practitioners
  3. eLearning and media specialists who create interactive learning experiences in the digital world
  4. Graphic designers who bring visual creativity and brand identity in the learning and communication space
  5. Web and application developers who use an agile development approach to develop user-friendly web, mobile and desktop applications

The process

This process is highly iterative.  As the rapid formative research methods get refined through field testing in various emergency contexts and countries, the web/app development team are iteratively developing the software. The software includes a learning component and the decision support component. The decision support tool has a simulation mode (check it out here) and a live mode (still in development). The formative research methods, the learning and the decision support components will be tested over a  two year period with multiple “early” releases of the software for early adopters to try it out and provide feedback.

Getting it out there

Great ideas, research and products only have value if they are used. They only get used if people know about them. CAWST engaged its communication, marketing and design team to design the Wash’Em brand identity, the Wash’Em website, and an agile marketing and engagement plan. Our strategy includes the usual conference presentations, but we also will be using simulation and testing events, targeted Google Ads, Facebook and LinkedIn Ads as well as direct WASH sector influencer engagement. We are building a network of interested professionals and influencers in the WASH and behaviour change sectors. We will use early adopters to test the software as we iterate through its development.


Sneak peek and design details

 

1. The different use cases for the software

Use cases

 

2. How the expert system engine should work.

Expert System

 

3. Early draft example of questions asked by the decision support tool.

Decision support tool questions

 

4. Early draft recommendations from the decision support tool.

Decision support tool outputs

 


About this project

“This project is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of Action Contre La Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

Hygiene Research in DRC

Working in partnership, ACF, LSHTM, and CAWST are bringing together their experience and networks to develop deep understandings of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings so as to contribute to the development of rapid and effective intervention tools.

CAWST has been working with Action Contre Faim (ACF) and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to improve handwashing practices among internally displaced people. The objective is to develop deep understanding of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings, ultimately to equip emergency practitioners with the knowledge and tools to intervene rapidly and effectively on hygiene behaviour. We are currently developing learning tools and a software-based decision-making tool to aid in the design of rapid, evidence-based programs.

In her earlier blog post, Sian White, the project’s lead researcher, shared four research methods she has been using and what these had revealed so far in her exploratory fieldwork in Iraq. In this update, Sian discusses the work done in DRC, including the research objectives and methods used and some of the key findings from the qualitative research.

Study site: DRC

 


Cholera has been endemic in DRC since 1994. In the eastern provinces of North and South Kivu, cases are registered throughout the year with peaks at the end of the dry season. However, in 2017 DRC experienced its worst cholera outbreak in decades with almost 50,000 suspected cases and over 900 deaths registered between January and December. Minova, where the research took place, sits alongside Lake Kivu, a renowned reservoir for vibro cholera. There are also two informal IDP camps in Minova and many other IDPs living in the community.

 

Qualitative research

Methods

The research was designed based on the Behaviour Centred Design framework (Aunger and Curtis, 2016). This framework outlines a set of behavioural determinants. For each of these a handwashing specific definition of the determinant was developed as an output of the literature review. By reviewing handwashing literature and looking more broadly a method was then selected to explore each determinant in the framework.

Key preliminary findings from the qualitative research

Handwashing behaviour

Observations indicated that handwashing with soap and hand rising (with water alone) were rare in these locations. Handwashing with soap was only observed once among the 17 observation households. Handwashing rarely took place after using the toilet but hand rinsing was sometimes practiced before eating, and this was actively taught to children as part of good mannerly behaviour. Hands rinsing was most often motivated by disgust, that is to say that hands were washed when they were visibly dirty (e.g. after returning from the field). Despite the low prevalence of handwashing behaviour people were well aware of the benefits of handwashing and 98% of participants could explain the association between handwashing and disease transmission.

One of the main factors that prevented convenient handwashing was the absence of handwashing facilities. None of the urban houses we visited had a dedicated place for handwashing. In camps facilities had been built several years ago but were now damaged and non-functional. In rural areas some houses had built tippy-taps (as part of a prior Community-led Total Sanitation campaign) but none were observed to be used or working. In focus groups people reported that they disliked the design of the tippy-taps and saw them as a symbol of poverty that they were not willing to adopt. Both water and soap were considered valuable and therefore people were often reluctant to store them near the toilets or kitchens which were often unclean, shared spaces. During behaviour trials participants identified that one of the barriers to handwashing was that there was nothing to cue behaviour at the key times and this prompted several people to design and build handwashing facilities. They were able to do so in a short period of time, using local materials and at no cost.

Handwashing is not considered to be a worthwhile use of soap. Partly this is because NGOs have promoted the use of ash as a free alternative for handwashing. Handwashing with ash was practiced by some people, but was described as unpleasant and undesirable, resulting in it being used infrequently. Where soap is available in households it is normally laundry powder or laundry bar soap. Although soap is rarely distributed by NGOs, in cases where it is, it is the laundry bar soap that is normally procured. However, participants explained that they would never use this for handwashing as it smells unpleasant and makes their hands dry. In camps and among host community members people live very communally. It is common for people to share containers and tools, share food and give water to a neighbour if they are running low. It was considered acceptable to ask a neighbour for soap to do laundry or for bathing but the idea of asking for soap for handwashing was considered humorous and people reported that you would be seen as trying to be above others if you did so.

In this setting it was common for daily household earnings to be less than $US 2. Daily routines were entirely oriented around earning enough to buy food for that day. With these limited resources adults would normally only eat once a day. People explained that their constant hunger constrained their capacity to remember to be hygienic (for example this was the main reason people said they often forget to wash hands prior to food preparation or eating). In order to earn sufficient money, adults spend most of their day in the fields, leaving young children at home unaccompanied. Parents acknowledged that they were worried about their children’s hygiene during these hours, but felt powerless to change this situation. This suggests that in this context the nurture motive may be less appropriate to utilise to promote handwashing. Although handwashing was a socially desirable behaviour, observed transgressions in handwashing practice were rarely socially sanctioned. This was largely because people normally adopted a forgiving attitude towards such transgressions, assuming that others, like them, must be dealing with poverty, hunger and psychological trauma (due to conflict and displacement). Affiliation (the desire to belong in a social group and therefore conform to group behaviours) did not emerge as a strong motivator of handwashing in this context. During the motives activity people explained that many of their close friends have poor hygiene but this just due to their circumstances rather than their character. In contrast people were judgmental of the handwashing behaviour of their spouse and explained that they could not be attracted to someone if they did not have clean hands. People did think that at a community-level handwashing increased in response to the cholera outbreak. People thought that for the majority of people this would only cause a short-term change in behaviour, but for others it could result in improved habits.

Attitudes and experiences of cholera

All participants were well informed about cholera and able to explain all key transmission routes. In focus group discussions people ranked cholera as the health issue that they were most concerned about and thought that it was the health issue which most commonly affected members of their community. In contrast diarrhoea was considered a mild health issue that did not have severe consequences and was only due to ‘disagreeable food’. Despite this reported ‘fear’ of cholera people simultaneously felt that cholera was just like any other disease and their familiarity with it over the years had allowed them to develop the belief that it could easily be treated (for free) and therefore rarely resulted in death. Consistent with this, many research participants told us that ‘black people don’t die of germs’. This saying was used to rationalise the fact that although most people viewed their environment as dirty and contaminated, and often lacked the means to be hygienic, it was rarely perceived to have adverse consequences. These factors have contributed to cholera no longer being seen as an outbreak disease but rather as a chronic health problem that the population had to manage and tolerate.

Although participants knew that good hygiene practices could reduce the likelihood of getting cholera most people who had contracted cholera felt that in their case it must have been due to bad luck, with the high prevalence of cases causing hygienic people like themselves to fall ill. Since most people knew someone who had had cholera recently there was minimal stigma towards the disease. People perceived it as normal for young children and older people to get cholera – in both cases people explained that this was because it is hard to control their behaviour. However, if healthy adults contracted cholera this was still met with confusion and stigma. Adult cholera cases reported that friends tended not to visit them when they heard they had got cholera. Immediate family and neighbours did not tend to ‘stay away’ nor change their opinion of the person with cholera. These individuals often played an important role in helping the cholera patient to recover. In addition to proximity, this may explain why intra-household transmission and transmission between neighbouring households was common in this region (and is well documented in the literature). Another contributing factor in this region is that cholera case management and follow-up remains suboptimal. On discharge patients are given 7 water treatment tablets and a small bar of laundry soap (although often they do not receive either). Providing such a small amount of hygiene provisions has the effect of distorting people’s risk perception, facilitating beliefs that it is not necessary to sustain good hygiene behaviours in the long term. This is of particular concern given that cholera cases may continue shedding for up to 50 days post discharge.

Although people had strong attitudes towards cholera as a disease, people on average had a poor understanding of the socio-economic impact that it could have on a household. Cholera cases described that they often felt weak and were unable to fulfil their normal tasks for up to a month after being discharged. In a context like DRC where people are generally living in extreme poverty and need to work in order to put food on the table each day, this has a substantial impact on the family economy. With less available of money, people said that they were normally unable to afford products like soap in the weeks after being discharged. Additionally, having a cholera case in the household often meant that the family could not collect as much water as normal (either because the women of the household were personally affected or because they were involved in caring for male household members who were sick). Both of these factors obviously place other family members at higher risk of contracting cholera.

Lastly people tended to associate cholera with people who they viewed to be categorically different from themselves. In focus group discussions people described a typical cholera cases as someone who is already sickly, has little respect for themselves or others, is arrogant and is poor and uneducated. Host community members thought cholera more commonly affected IDPs, while IDPs felt that they often had to behave more hygienically in order to rise above their circumstances and were therefore less likely to get cholera than the host community.

Implications for practitioners

• Knowledge: Almost everyone understood the association between handwashing and disease transmission. This means that we can stop educating people about disease transmission as part of programs.
• Behavioural settings: Creating dedicated places for handwashing would help to reposition handwashing as a norm and act as a cue or reminder to prompt behaviour. Prior programs that have attempted to do this have installed facilities that are not considered pleasant to use and which break easily. New initiatives should incentivise family units or compounds to design and build their own facilities that are appealing and affordable. Doing these initiatives at the compound level could work well in this context since neighbours are already reliant on each other for many aspects of their daily lives. This would enable families to pool their resources so that they are able to purchase soap for handwashing. A collective commitment to handwashing among the compound members might make handwashing more social judged and therefore adhered to. This may also enable soap and water to be kept at the handwashing facilities.
• Products: There is a need to change perceptions towards soap. This may require organisations to reduce the extent to which they promote handwashing with ash. It will also require hygiene promotion activities that highlight the non-health benefits of soap, such as how nice hands smell afterwards or how soft they feel. This should be done through experiential learning (e.g. people trying different soap products and seeing how they smell). There may also be opportunities to work with women’s groups to rebrand/decorate locally produced soaps to make them more appealing.
• Supporting cholera cases upon discharge: Stronger efforts should be made to map where cholera cases reside and to support patients upon discharge. This will be critical for reducing transmission within the household and among neighbouring households. Tailored hygiene promotion and hygiene kits should be provided to families with a cholera case and their neighbours. Ideally cholera cases should receive hygiene provisions (e.g soap) sufficient for the first three months after their discharge (the period when they are still able to transmit the disease). The provision of hygiene products for this period should be staged. With some given immediately and further provisions given once the family has built a handwashing facility, for example.
 Shifting community perceptions towards cholera: Cholera is understood as a disease but its increasing familiarity is breeding complacency. Rather than continuing to tell people about the health risks of cholera it may be more effective to humanise the disease and emphasise other types of impacts that people are currently unaware of – such as the impact of cholera on household economies and on a person’s social relationships. It is important that this be done in a manner which is not just fearmongering but rather helps people to see a now familiar disease in a new light. One way of doing it would be to film short videos with people who have had cholera and get them to describe their personal experiences. These could then be taken house to house when doing hygiene promotion and shown on tablets/mobile devices.
• Motives: Disgust is currently the primary motivator of handwashing but could still be heightened by implementing activities like Glow Germs (www.glogerm.com). Motives that have been previously used to promote handwashing behaviour such as nurture and affiliation are likely to be less effective in this context than the motives of comfort and attract. One way that this could be done is by creating a picture or video-based narrative that links handwashing with romance and beauty or positions it as a way of feeling momentarily more comfortable despite difficult circumstances.
• Keeping a broad view: People in this context are under a lot of psychological and economic strain. Those delivering hygiene programs need to be mindful of the much bigger issues that people are facing and ideally connect people with other development initiatives which try to address these issues.

 

 


About this project

“This project is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of Action Contre La Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

TRANSFORM – DFID and Unilever

The mission of TRANSFORM is to collaborate with innovators to reduce poverty and make sustainable living commonplace. As part of our mission to drive progress towards accomplishing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), TRANSFORM invites social innovators and entrepreneurs to submit their applications for market-based solutions that meet the needs of low-income communities. The most recent call for proposals was for innovative models that open up access to high-impact products for underserved consumers in hard-to-reach rural locations (countries of interest were Nigeria, Ethiopia, India, Bangladesh and Myanmar).

Fondation Mérieux

Fondation Mérieux’s grants programme contributes towards financing projects that aim to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. The projects including as beneficiaries mothers and children will be given priority. Fondation Mérieux’s grants programme is open to the projects of private individuals, organizations or associations, provided that they are long-term and incorporate local health. The project must meet the following criteria:

  • It is run in a developing country by local people;
  • It relates to HIV / AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, hepatitis, neglected tropical infections and other infectious diseases that represent significant problems to public health;
  • It provides concrete solutions that are suitable and sustainable for the local population and goes beyond education and outreach.

Each selected project will receive a maximum grant of 5,000 euros.

Fondation SUEZ

The vocation of the Fondation SUEZ is to combat exclusion by favouring inclusion and consequently sustainably improving the living conditions and autonomy of persons via access to essential services, social insertion and social harmony. The Fondation SUEZ supports concrete actions in favour of: Access to essential services (water, sanitation and waste) for disadvantaged populations in developing countries; The insertion of vulnerable populations thanks to employment and training in France; Social harmony through education, culture and sport, in France.

Inspiring Environmental Stewardship in Grande Cache

Over the past three years, Johanna Dalton has used the CAWST Wavemakers Environmental Stewardship course for Career Technology Foundations to inspire her Grade 9 students to take action as environmental leaders.

This story was written by Johanna Dalton, a Grade 9 teacher in Grande Cache, Alberta.

Over the past three years I taught a grade 9 Environmental Stewardship course and each year I used CAWST’s online Career & Technology Foundations course to help to facilitate the class. The course provides engaging opportunities for cross-curricular and project-based learning – how many classes do you get to take where you can create a project on (almost) anything, and get money to do it?! Even though I only teach this course to grade 9 students, each year has been very different and varies depending on my students.

In my first year, students decided to do a science fair style presentation to teach youth about water and sanitation issues, and each student was able to participate in a role suited to their interests and abilities. Students were not only responsible for preparing and presenting their station, but they were also responsible for communicating with the schools, designing t-shirts, and ensuring everything ran smoothly on the day of the science fair. We presented at each of the four schools in Grande Cache.

In my second year, I had a class of predominantly boys who happened to be avid hunters and fishers. They were not overly interested in working with other students, or running an awareness campaign, so after much thought and deliberation we decided to build “Portable Poopers.”  They were designed to protect our water source, as some ice fishers were defecating in the lake instead of making the 10 minute drive back to town. My students built a wooden box around a five-gallon removable pail, with a toilet seat and toilet roll holder that could be dragged or carried onto the ice. We hosted an event called P.O.W.S (Protect Our Water Source) and invited members of the community to learn about our water source and have a chance at winning one of our three “Portable Poopers”.

This year my students decided to create an “Amazing Water Race” and they made up stations for other students to race through. The stations included a few different relay-type games: one to simulate garbage and water collection; a knowledge-based card game, and the final station was creating a biosand filter. The team with the cleanest water was awarded reusable water bottles, and each participant received a metal straw.

It might sound like I’ve had phenomenal groups of environmentally active and engaged students, but that isn’t generally the case. There are often a number of students with minimal interests in the environment, so engagement can be challenging.

The awesome thing about CAWST’s program is that it is really flexible, which allows me to adapt each year to different groups of students. It also connects both global and local issues, which provide opportunity to understand bigger issues while promoting first-hand understanding, connections and experiences.

Though each year’s project turns out to be very different, I am always impressed with my students’ ability to pull it off. This program has provided multiple opportunities for community engagement and the development of lifelong skills for my students.


We can’t wait to see what Johanna’s new class will be up next year!

Through our Wavemakers program, educators across Alberta, like Johanna Dalton, incorporate global water education into their curriculum. We also support teachers and students to create and implement action projects.

Are you an Albertan K12 teacher interested in engaging your students in water and sanitation? Connecting global and environmental education to your classroom? Contact us to learn how to implement our free Wavemakers resources for educators

Partnerships and Funder Relations

At CAWST, we are passionate about what we do and we are seeking someone to join our team who is driven to increase our base of support. This person collects, analyses and synthesizes information to help build and steward strategic relationships with collaborators and funding partners, and develops and maintains the business systems and processes required to do this. She/he connects the dots, finding opportunities to package CAWST’s services to funders, and may lead the relationship-building directly. This person takes on the challenge of writing concisely to distill and articulate complex concepts and tell CAWST’s story. She/he enjoys working with a team to deliver a finished product, and plays a key role in garnering the funds for CAWST to do its work.

At CAWST, we are passionate about what we do and we are seeking someone to join our team who is driven to increase our base of support. This person collects, analyses and synthesizes information to help build and steward strategic relationships with collaborators and funding partners, and develops and maintains the business systems and processes required to do this. She/he connects the dots, finding opportunities to package CAWST’s services to funders, and may lead the relationship-building directly. This person takes on the challenge of writing concisely to distill and articulate complex concepts and tell CAWST’s story. She/he enjoys working with a team to deliver a finished product, and plays a key role in garnering the funds for CAWST to do its work.

The position: Partnerships & Funder Relations

Reports to: Director, International Partnerships

Type: Full Time, permanent position

Location: The position is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Position start date: As soon as possible

Application Due Date: Review of applications will begin on July 3, 2018 and will continue to be accepted until the position is filled

Compensation: Salary will be discussed in the personal interview so please include salary expectations in your cover letter

 

Position Summary

The Partnerships & Funder Relations position plays a key role in increasing CAWST’s base of support, and is primarily responsible for managing the fund development process and improving the organization’s grant- and contract-based fund development capacity, overall. This ranges from identifying and contacting potential funders and sleuthing relevant information, to coordinating proposal content from various staff, writing proposals, developing detailed project budgets, managing grant administration, providing reports to donors, and improving internal fund development systems and processes. This position also provides communication support services to aid in CAWST’s profile and credibility building initiatives as required. Target audiences include international WASH sector organizations including major development organizations and institutional funders such as foundations, governments, other non-governmental organizations and corporate foundations. This position works with all departments and engages with a variety of people to carry out these responsibilities.
 

Specific Areas of Responsibility

  1. Prospect Research, Cultivation and Stewardship
    • Scan for potential partners and funders, and investigate which prospects are ‘best fit’ for CAWST.
    • Understand and interpret funding guidelines and determine whether CAWST is eligible for and aligned with prospective funders.
    • Examine and assess prospective funders to identify their key messages, investment priorities, business objectives, and areas of shared value.
    • Maintain a system to track and prioritize potential funding opportunities and communicate these to various CAWST staff.
    • Prepare briefing notes by researching and synthesizing background on potential collaborators or funders for meetings, conferences, presentations and events.
    • Develop and steward relationships with prospective and secured collaborators and funders.

 

  1. Proposal Development and Investor Reporting
    • Drive the grant proposal process, including collection and analysis of relevant information from CAWST departments to form the basis of proposals, grant applications, and funder stewardship reports.
    • Understand CAWST’s model, business, and operational plans by actively connecting with staff and CAWST partners.
    • Determine potential ‘angles’ for grant applications and proposals.
    • Draft concept notes, letters of intent and other communication materials used to reach out to and engage potential funders.
    • Develop timelines and coordinate cross-functional teams involved in the proposal development process, ensuring that proposals are on track and that all key players understand their role. Ensure deadlines are met.
    • Communicate CAWST’s key messages to capture and reflect shared value with the prospect’s investment objectives.
    • Support the execution of grant agreements and ensure all agreement requirements are fulfilled.

 

  1. Support Fund and Earned Revenue Development Activities:
    • Provide fund development and communications support to CAWST field staff (Global Services) as they engage in business and fund development activities.
    • Produce activity and financial reports for partners and funders, with support from other departments.
    • Provide support to leadership team, staff, and volunteers with key messages for prospective funders where appropriate.
    • Develop communications tools to support strategies as required.

Other duties as required


Education, Experience, and Skills

  1. Education
    • Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in a related discipline.

2. Experience
• 3-5 years work experience in a related discipline such as grant or contract management, internal/external communications and/or fund development.
• Experience in project management; proven track record of facilitating successful team projects.
• Experience in writing proposals and concept notes.
• Experience developing project budgets, comfortable working with financial information.
• Familiarity with principals and best practices in fund development is preferred.
• International development experience is preferred.
• Experience working in the non-profit sector, especially in the international WASH sector, is considered an asset.
• Experience in writing successful grant proposals for international development projects is considered an asset.

3. Skills
• Passion for CAWST and its cause!
• Communication: Excellent written and verbal English with the ability to develop messaging for different target audiences; able to interpret complex or technical information and translate it into easy-to-understand messages for prospective funders.
• Coordination and project management: Experience coordinating short-term projects in a fast-paced, team environment.
• Attention to detail: Able to manage all components down to the last detail.
• Multi-tasking: Able to prioritize and adjust workload to meet multiple competing deadlines.
• Investigation and Analysis: Enjoys finding/collecting information and results across departments; ability to compile and present information effectively.
• Analytical capability: Assess opportunities and make recommendations.
• Interpersonal: Build rapport to engage and motivate a variety of stakeholders and establish long-term relationships.
• Team player: An accomplished professional who can work well both independently and within a team.
• Comprehension and synthesis: Strong reading comprehension and information synthesis skills.
• Problem solver: Able to think creatively about challenges, resolve issues, and seek support when necessary.
• Computer skills: Proficient in Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and in using databases.

 

To Apply

Please send your cover letter, resume, and questionnaire answers (see below) to cawstHR@cawst.org . Reference Partnerships & Funder Relations Role in the email subject line. The position will be open until filled. No phone calls please. Only those candidates able to work in Canada will be reviewed; and only those granted an interview will be contacted.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

 

Questionnaire

Please answer all questions to the best of your ability. Be as specific as possible and try to keep each answer under half a page.

  • What has motivated you to consider working at CAWST in this position?
  • How would you articulate CAWST’s business model and approach to development? What are the opportunities and challenges in articulating this approach to potential donors and funders?
  • Describe your experience and role in obtaining grants from governments and/or large corporations/foundations (preferably in an international development context). What do you see are some key strategies and steps in grant writing/applications that lead to success?
  • What strategies/processes do you use to reach target audiences with the ‘right’ message?

 


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 15.4 million people get better water or sanitation.

The Financial Post named CAWST one of the Top 23 Charities in Canada in 2017. Read the article.

 

Imágenes del Primer Taller Regional en Latinoamérica de la Red Internacional de TANDAS: “Avanzando la Agenda de Seguridad del Agua”.

Un ensayo fotográfico sobre el primer Taller regional TANDAS, en mayo de 2018, que reunió al sector hídrico en Colombia para avanzar la agenda del agua segura en Latinoamérica.

Hace unas semanas tuvo lugar en la ciudad de Bogotá, Colombia, el primer Taller Regional Latinoamericano de la Red Internacional de Tratamiento de Agua a Nivel Domiciliario (TANDAS) encabezada por OMS/OPS y UNICEF. El Gobierno de Colombia, a través del Ministerio de Vivienda, Ciudad y Territorio y el Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social, fue el anfitrión local y CAWST fuimos los encargados de la facilitación del Taller.

Con este blog fotográfico, queremos compartir con los asistentes, miembros de la Red que no pudieron acompañarnos y demás interesados, algunas imágenes que ilustran este exitoso evento.

Para más detalles acerca de las diferentes sesiones del Taller e información sobre las presentaciones, se invita a los interesados que visiten esta página en nuestra Base de Conocimientos de TANDAS: hwts.info/tandas. También los invitamos a ver la colección completa de fotografías en nuestros álbumes.

Día 1

Inicialmente, el Taller estaba planificado para un máximo de 40 personas. Sin embargo, una vez empezamos a contactar con los países invitados, dado el interés mostrado y la creciente demanda, decidimos aprovechar la ocasión y ampliar el número de países participantes e invitados. Finalmente, pudimos contar con más de 90 personas que participaron durante los 3 días del evento.

La Dra. Gina Watson (Representante de Colombia de la OPS), la Dra. Viviana Limpias, (Representante de Colombia de UNICEF), el Dr. Diego Felipe Polania (director de Desarrollo sectorial del Ministerio de Vivienda) y la Dra. Adriana Estrada (directora de salud ambiental del Ministerio de Salud) fueron los encargados de llevar a cabo la apertura oficial del evento. La Recalcaron la importancia de este tipo de eventos y de establecer relaciones entre representantes gubernamentales de diferentes países para seguir trabajando en avanzar respecto al ODS número 6.

En la imagen, de izquierda a derecha: Dra. Adriana Estrada, Dra. Gina Watson, Dra. Viviana Limpias y el Dr. Diego Felipe Polania.

La primera sesión del evento fue liderada por Fiorella Polo, Alban Nouvellon (ambos de UNICEF) y Henry Hernandez (OPS) cuyo objetivo era presentar la situación global y regional del sector, incluyendo los desafíos a los que se enfrenta Latinoamérica para el cumplimiento de los ODS, como la reducción de brechas y desigualdades entro lo urbano y lo rural, acceso a servicios de poblaciones vulnerables, como poblaciones indígenas o la mejora en los sistemas de información.

Una vez definidos los desafíos a los que se enfrenta la región, llegó el momento de empezar a trabajar en la búsqueda de soluciones y alternativas para solventarlos. Para ello, Fiorella Polo realizó una presentación introductoria acerca de qué se entiende por los marcos de seguridad del agua y Eva Manzano, asesora global de CAWST para la región, relató brevemente cómo el TANDAS encaja dentro de los planes y enfoques de seguridad del agua.

En la tarde, tuvimos la oportunidad de contar con la Dra. Salua Osorio, del INAGUA de Colombia que compartió con los asistentes los resultados preliminares del estudio realizado para la OPS sobre el estado de incorporación de los componentes del Marco de la Seguridad del agua (calidad, PSA, vigilancia), en varios países de la región, incluyendo Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil Colombia, Costa Rica Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, México, Perú y Uruguay.

A continuación, Fiorella realizó una presentación, seguida por un trabajo grupal por países, acerca de los pilares o componentes para alcanzar la seguridad del agua. Este ejercicio permitió a los participantes identificar en qué se está trabajando, en qué áreas existen brechas, qué actores son responsables y qué oportunidades existen respecto a componentes como políticas de seguridad de agua, implementación de planes de seguridad de agua y TANDAS y el monitoreo de resultados.

Para finalizar el día, contamos con la experiencia del Gobierno de Colombia y el trabajo que vienen haciendo en el desarrollo de políticas públicas referentes al sector. Inicialmente, Juan Manuel Flechas, del Ministerio de Vivienda, nos explicó los antecedentes que han originado los cambios en las políticas en lo referente al acceso y vigilancia del agua potable en el país. A continuación, Andrea Bernal, también del Ministerio de Vivienda, compartió cómo el Decreto 1898 de 2016 está enfocado a cerrar brechas entre lo urbano y lo rural y reconoce la posibilidad del uso de soluciones alternativas o TANDAS, cuando los sistemas tradicionales de acueducto comunitario no son posibles.

Karen López, del Ministerio de Vivienda, compartió con los asistentes el proceso de verificación y de selección de tecnologías que se viene haciendo en el país con el objeto de apoyar a los implementadores en la toma de decisiones cuando determinen aplicar opciones TANDAS. Del mismo modo, el proceso de verificación permitirá evaluar que las tecnologías cumplen con las características que determinan sus fabricantes.

Por último, Adriana Estrada, del Ministerio de Salud, compartió el trabajo que viene haciéndose desde el sector salud para la inclusión y desarrollo de políticas de vigilancia y control de la calidad del agua, como los mapas de riesgo.

Al final del día, se celebró un cóctel de bienvenida para todos los invitados y otros actores clave del sector del agua en Colombia donde los asistentes pudieron pasar un rato divertido.

 

Día 2

El segundo día comenzó con la lectura de las conclusiones del día 1 por parte de Ivette Gómez, de la oficina de OPS Colombia.

Después, seguimos trabajando y profundizando en el tema de la seguridad del agua. Para ello, contamos con una presentación por parte de Fiorella, que explicó más en detalle acerca de cómo funcionan los planes de seguridad del agua y de cómo se están adaptando para sistemas rurales. A continuación, Justine Rayner, de la Universidad de Tufts, compartió un estudio realizado en varios países sobre la implementación de planes de seguridad del agua y cuáles fueron las lecciones aprendidas.

Por último, Eva Manzano y Laura Macdonald de CAWST realizaron una presentación más detallada de acerca de cómo el TANDAS puede jugar un papel importante en la mejora de la calidad del agua en el punto de consumo, incidiendo positivamente en la mejora de la salud.

La siguiente sesión fue probablemente la más disfrutada por los participantes puesto que pudieron escuchar sobre experiencias de implementación reales de Colombia, la región y globales de cómo diferentes instituciones están trabajando en dar solución a la problemática de la seguridad del agua. Para ello, tuvimos la suerte de contar con un experimentado grupo de ponentes.

María Inestroza, de Pure Water for the World Honduras, nos contó acerca del trabajo que su organización viene haciendo en la implementación de filtros de bioarena y de su uso sostenido en el tiempo gracias a los agentes comunitarios con los que trabajan.

Sabrina Zimmerman, del Banco Mundial, compartió un estudio realizado en la región sobre las desigualdades en el sector del agua y saneamiento.

Jorge Villarreal compartió la experiencia del Departamento de Salud de Atlántico, donde se usaron filtros cerámicos como solución a la rotura de un dique, lo que generó importantes inundaciones.

Joshua Briemberg, de WaterAid Nicaragua, compartió su experiencia trabajando en el desarrollo de mercados para tecnologías TANDAS y el establecimiento de soluciones SMART para promover y adquirir este tipo de tecnologías.

Patricia Segurado, de OPS México nos contó del trabajo que vienen haciendo implementando planes de seguridad del agua en la zona de Chiapas.

Dorian Robinson, de EAWAG Suiza, nos presentó el trabajo que han realizado en Nepal implementando planes de seguridad del agua, tecnologías TANDAS para la mejora de la calidad del agua y haciendo seguimiento construyendo incubadoras portátiles con materiales locales.

Fabiola Berón, del departamento de salud del Valle del Cauca, nos compartió el trabajo que hacen desde su región en la implementación de mapas de riesgo, una herramienta para la identificación de riesgos vinculados a la calidad del agua.

JuliánTéllez, de la Secretaria de Salud de Nariño, compartió la experiencia que se tiene en su departamento con la implementación de diversas tecnologías TANDAS.

Puesto que, por falta de tiempo, los participantes no pudieron visitar todas las estaciones, después realizaron un ejercicio donde pudieron compartir cuáles eran las principales lecciones aprendidas de cada uno de los proyectos presentados.

Como última sesión del Taller, los participantes volvieron a agruparse por países para trabajar en el desarrollo de sus planes de acción, que después compartieron con el grupo en plenaria.

Una vez compartidos los planes de acción de todos los países presentes (México, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, República Dominicana, Panamá, Haití, Ecuador, Perú, Bolivia, Argentina y Colombia), los representantes regionales de la OPS y UNICEF compartieron sus conclusiones sobre el evento y ofrecieron su apoyo a los países para el cumplimiento de sus planes de acción.

Finalmente, representantes de los Ministerios anfitriones realizaron el cierre oficial del Taller, tras no antes agradecer a los participantes, organizadores y financiadores (P&G y UNICEF) por su participación y apoyo para que el Taller se llevase a cabo de forma exitosa.

Y antes de marcharnos, la obligatoria foto de grupo para recordar el evento.

Día 3

Tras el Taller, se organizaron dos visitas de campo para que los participantes pudieran ver de primera mano algunos proyectos que se están implementando en los alrededores de Bogotá. Dado a las limitaciones de tiempo, los participantes tuvieron que escoger entre uno de los proyectos.

El primero de los proyectos fue un programa de filtros de bioarena domiciliarios implementando por la Fundación San Cipriano y apoyado por la Fundación Red Proyecto Gente y la Asocicación Canadiense para el Desarrollo Participativo (CAPD, por sus siglas en inglés). Está situado en Viotá, en el departamento de Cundinamarca.

Pilar Posada, gerente del proyecto guió a los asistentes explicándoles cómo funcionan los filtros, su construcción y el trabajo comunitario educativo que se hace con los usuarios para asegurar un uso sostenido de la tecnología.

También tuvieron la oportunidad de visitar algunos domicilios y conocer las impresiones de los usuarios de los filtros y aprovechar la visita a esta zona cálida para poder disfrutar de la variedad de frutas producidas localmente y de la gastronomía colombiana.

El segundo proyecto estaba ubicado en Tena, Cundinamarca y se trataba de una torre de ultrafiltración implementada en una escuela por la Fundación Agua por la Vida.

Gustavo Samper, director de la organización, junto con el maestro responsable de la escuela explicaron a los participantes cómo se construyó e instaló la torre y sistema de filtración, además de hacer una demostración de los materiales educativos que han desarrollado para educar a los niños en la importancia de consumir agua segura y poner en prácticas otros hábitos importantes, como el lavado de manos.

 


Eva Manzano, BEng, MA, es una asesora global de WASH en el equipo de servicios globales de CAWST. Ha brindado servicios de entrenamiento y consultoría a nuestros clientes en Latinoamérica y el sureste de Asia desde 2011. Eva habla español, inglés e italiano. 

Conozca más:

Para obtener más información sobre los servicios de capacitación y consultoría de CAWST en América Latina, por favor comuníquese con Eva Manzano por correo electrónico a: emanzano@cawst.org

 

St. Joseph’s School ECOClub Living Wall Project

The creation of St. Joseph’s Living Wall was a Wavemakers Action Project focused on conserving water and reducing plastic waste.

This story was written by the ECOClub students of St. Joseph’s Collegiate school in Brooks, Alberta.

St. Joseph’s ECOClub was inspired this year to build an outdoor greenhouse for all students to enjoy, and to grow herbs and produce for the Food Program to use. That dream withered as the school had renovations, which did not allow for permanent space for the structure. Our team of 11 students reworked this dream, focusing on reducing water usage and plastic waste. We focused on the social area water fountain and vending machines; the water fountain was not being used because of its old design, and students were buying plastic water bottles without reusing them. A new water bottle filling station was generously donated by ECOBrooks and installed in our social area. To date, 6,746 water bottles have been saved and students have been educated about the impact that this had on the water usage and decrease in plastic waste in our school.

Our club also wanted to utilize the water bottle station grey water to water plants by turning our social area wall into a living green space. The club installed two eavestrough planters (donated by WellHung Eavestrough) with edible plants and flowers grown hydroponically. The water from the fountain circulated through a series of pumps and hoses to be recycled through the living wall. Soon, the Food classes and our whole school will be able to enjoy thyme, strawberries, tomatoes, and more from our hydroponic living wall.

After many struggles and setbacks, the ECOClub is proud of their role on our school’s environmental impact.

ECOClub would like to thank Bloomin’ Acres Greenhouses, Bradie Sturch, Brooks Hydroponics Centre, Canadian Tire Brooks, CAWST, ConocoPhillips Canada, CTR Catholic Schools, ECOBrooks, Inside Education, and WellHung Eavestrough.

ECOClub was led by Mrs. Natalie Sturch, Ms Amanda Milot and Ms Jolanda Brinkhof, and our members Cameron Hill, Chey Zwicker, Juan Espitia, Sintia Avelar, Karoll Cabrera, Monica Neeser-Carazo, Katy Perez, Carlos Gonzalez, Marcela Sevillano, Aaron Solis and Sheena Bacquial.


We’re proud of the ECOClub’s positive impact on the environment!

CAWST’s Wavemakers program empowers youth to be global citizens and take action on global and local water and sanitation issues.

Are you an Albertan K12 teacher and interested in your class making a positive on the environment too? Check out our free resources for educators such as lesson plans, games, and tools for action projects like St. Joseph’s Collegiate ECOClub. You might also be interested in our professional development workshops on how to integrate global and local water issues into your curriculum.

CAWST in the News: CAWST Co-Founder David Manz to Receive Alberta’s Highest Honour

Dr. David Manz, inventor of the biosand filter and co-founder of CAWST, will become a member of the Alberta Order of Excellence this fall.

Dr. David Manz, CAWST co-founder and inventor of the biosand filter.
Dr. David Manz, CAWST co-founder and inventor of the biosand filter.

CALGARY, May 14, 2018 – Through the Alberta Order of Excellence, the Province of Alberta recognizes outstanding citizens, community leaders and innovators for their lifetime of remarkable contributions. This year, in acknowledgement of his outstanding international impact, Dr. David Manz, co-founder of CAWST and inventor of the biosand filter, will become a member of the Alberta Order of Excellence.

In October of 2018, Dr. David Manz, along with seven other Albertans -including k.d. lang and Canada’s first female pilot, Rosella Bjornson- will become members of the Alberta Order of Excellence. Members are inducted into the Order at a special ceremony at Government House in Edmonton. Dr. Manz will be among only 173 members of the Alberta Order of Excellence.

Read the announcement by the Government of Alberta here.

The biosand filter is a household water treatment technology. It was inspired by slow sand filtration, a water treatment process that has been used since the early 1800s. It depends on the same processes that naturally occur in sand at the banks of rivers. Dr. David Manz invented the biosand filter in the early 1990s at the University of Calgary. He co-founded CAWST in 2001 and made his invention freely available for humanitarian means.

CAWST is delighted to congratulate Dr. Manz, one of Canada’s leading humanitarians, on this well-deserved commendation, which is the highest honour a citizen can receive from the province of Alberta. Dr. Manz’s biosand filter invention, as well as his vision and generosity, have been integral to bringing safe, clean water to millions of people around the world.


Learn more about the biosand filter here, and find technical information about the biosand filter here and at manzwaterinfo.ca.

Banner image: CAWST. A little girl in Nepal drinks clean water from a biosand filter.

Full Circle: A CAWST Wavemakers Action Project by Caden Albright

Full Circle is the story of a Wavemakers Action Project written by Caden Albright, a Grade 11 Student at Bishop Carroll High School in Calgary, Canada. Caden took action locally to raise awareness of his peers and globally to support a Peruvian NGO called DESEA.

This story was written by Caden Albright, a Grade 11 Student at Bishop Carroll High School in Calgary, Alberta.

I first heard about Youth Wavemaker’s Ride the Rockies via an “Energy and Environmental Innovations” class. I became interested in CAWST because it reflects both areas I intend to study at university – engineering and the environment.

My family was planning to travel and volunteer in Peru in the spring of 2018. We had previously spent 8 months living in a village in the Sacred Valley. When we started to research NGO’s in the area we were surprised to discover that a local Peruvian NGO, DESEA, was using biosand technology initially developed by CAWST! I attended the Youth Wavemaker’s Summit (Fall 2017) that reinforced the importance of engaging Calgary youth in developing an awareness of water issues. I submitted a proposal that reflected both local and global action.

Locally

The project has supported two Calgary middle school students/teachers to access learning resources and facilitated classroom workshops through CAWST. The ‘Me-to-We’ students at Willow Park School have initiated a broader awareness project within their community. They held a bake sale and are facilitating a ‘Water Walk’. Proceeds of both fundraising projects will go towards purchasing biosand filters for Indigenous families in remote villages in the high Andes of Peru. CAWST has also facilitated learning workshops for Grade 7 and 8 classes at Marshall Springs School. The students at Marshall Springs will connect with students in Peru to facilitate cultural exchange and to learn about different water systems.

To date, we have raised over $3,000 for the purchase of biosand filters and classroom water buckets (with faucets) for Indigenous communities. We are hopeful that Willow Park’s ‘Water Walk’ will raise additional support and that some individuals/classrooms will continue to support international water projects.

Globally

DESEA Peru is a Peruvian NGO that partners with vulnerable Andean communities to achieve well-being through water, health, education, and economic opportunities. It is in its tenth year of operation. PVC biosand water filters are a simple technology that is extremely effective in the high Andes. My brother Seth and I helped to construct filters – drilling PVC and attaching faucets, sifting and washing sand and gravel, etc. We also participated in biosand filter installations with the local engineer, David, who identifies families who qualify and supervises the installation in each home.

DESEA’s values are consistent with values of CAWST building the capacity of local populations to address their own needs. DESEA trains local health care workers, called ‘Qualis’, to provide health support in their communities. They visit each family at least once a month to monitor health and to check that the water filters are working to capacity. The Qualis are supported by professional DESEA health care staff who provide health and water services.

In addition to the water treatment program, DESEA offers health education to both school-age children and adults. We participated in two health fairs – helping to teach primary school children about water and sanitation, healthy nutrition, and keeping their environment clean. Children’s height and weight were measured and they were tested for anemia – a common problem in the region. It was a lot of fun to help out at the health fairs and great to see the kids so excited and interested in learning.

The staff at DESEA in Peru, are incredibly dedicated workers. It was a privilege to work with them and to see the impact that potable water and safely managed sanitation can have on Indigenous communities in the high Andes. I am very grateful for the opportunity to participate in CAWST’s Youth Wavemakers program and intend to stay engaged in the work to promote universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water.


Youth involved in the Wavemakers program have reached over 100,000 Canadians with their action projects. These projects showcase the amazing work being done by youth to impact water and sanitation issues locally and globally.

Youth Wavemakers constantly inspire and amaze us. You can read about action projects like Cadean Albright’s here.

The Community Health (or WASH) Promoters, called “Qualis” in Peru, are critical in increasing the WASH knowledge of community members, ensuring correct, consistent and continued use of WASH technologies, and for follow-up beyond the initial implementation. They are a critical component for creating lasting changes in a community. CAWST provides consulting support and training for managers to mobilize community agents to work with households. 

CAWST in the News: World Water Magazine

Our Director of International Partnerships shares insights with World Water about Canada’s leading role in water security, and CAWST’s global expertise developing women’s knowledge and skills about safe water so they become agents of change in their communities.

CALGARY, May 8, 2018 – Katherine Balpatacki, editor of World Water magazine magazine, recently interviewed CAWST’s Director of International Partnerships, Millie Adams, who shared her insights on capacity development, garnered over more than a decade in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector. In this article, she explains how women become agents of change and transform their communities when they develop their WASH knowledge and skills.

Here’s an excerpt from the article, quoting Millie Adam:

Developing women’s capacity to fully participate in the provision, management, and safeguarding of water not only works toward closing gender gaps but also leads to better results for WASH programs. (…) Capacity-building is explicitly identified [in the SDG framework] as one of the primary means of implementation, particularly for water and sanitation.

Read the full article here.

 

World Water magazine is a resource for more than 35,000 professionals who follow Water Canada in print and online. It is published by The Water Environment Federation (WEF), a not-for-profit technical and educational organization with 75 affiliated Member Associations that represent water quality professionals around the world.

We’re looking forward to participating in the WEF’s upcoming Canadian Water Summit from June 20 to 22. See you in Vancouver!


CAWST is a Canadian-based non-profit and engineering firm that distills and disseminates knowledge on non-networked water, sanitation and hygiene solutions in low- to middle-income countries. Since 2001, we have been walking beside our global network of clients and partners, helping them to develop their capacity so they can ultimately operate independently without our assistance.

Banner image: CAWST. Empowering women to become agents of change through capacity development in water,sanitation and hygiene. Nepal, 2017.

Latin American WASH Sector gathers in Colombia to share knowledge, learn and advance the agenda of safe water in the region

The WHO/UNICEF International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS) is hosting the first Latin America Regional Workshop: “Advancing the Water Safety Agenda” in Bogota, Colombia, May 7-9, 2018.

Photo: CAWST

HWTS Network Latin America Regional Workshop in Bogota, Colombia

 

CALGARY, April 27, 2018 — CAWST is delighted to announce its participation in the first Latin America Regional Workshop: “Advancing the Water Safety Agenda” in Bogota, Colombia, May 7th to 9th, 2018. This trailblazing event will be hosted by the WHO/UNICEF International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS).

The Government of Colombia, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) / World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF, with the support of CAWST and other members of the network, will lead a participatory 3-day workshop to engage inter-sectoral stakeholders and unify efforts to make progress toward Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6.1, focusing on improved service delivery to achieve water safety from catchment to point-of-use.

In Latin America, access to improved water sources is high, but ensuring water safety remains a challenge, especially in remote, rural areas and areas of peri-urban growth. To address the challenge of safe water provision in such areas, the government of Colombia established several regulations in 2016 acknowledging alternative solutions for settings when centrally treated, piped water is not feasible. These regulations authorize municipalities and service providers to use a combination of service delivery approaches, including HWTS, to address water safety and reach unserved populations. As such, The WHO/UNICEF International Network on HWTS is hosting a Latin America Regional Workshop to learn from Colombia’s experience, share with and learn from other partners, and jointly advance the water safety agenda in the region.

General statistics show high levels of water coverage in many areas across Latin America”, explains Eva Manzano, Global WASH Advisor at CAWST, who will be facilitating this workshop. “However, in many cases, water quality is still a key challenge. Household water treatment and safe storage can play a key role in addressing this gap. Treating water in the home protects people from waterborne disease immediately, is affordable to reach the large number of people currently unserved, improves households’ resilience, and paves the way for better health, hygiene, and sanitation.

Interested in collaborating? Join us!

This event targets government representatives from the region, and network members are also welcome to participate. The event will be held in Spanish. If you are interested in attending and able to cover your own expenses to do so, please contact Eva Manzano (Global WASH Advisor, CAWST) at emanzano@cawst.org by May 1st. You can find event details at hwts.info/tandas.

Learn more

· How Colombia is innovating for safe water access and basic sanitation in dispersed populations, through its new legislation.

· The personal impact of capacity development in a rural community in Colombia.

· The business case for capacity development.

· Sustainable Development Goal 6.

· “2.1 billion people lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 4.5 billion people lack access to safely managed sanitation”. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2017.


Media Inquiries

Eva Manzano, BEng, MA
Global WASH Advisor
CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology)
  emanzano@cawst.org
  (Canadá): 1.403.243.3285 ext. 244
  (España): 34.717.701637


About CAWST

CAWST is a centre of expertise focused on providing training, consulting and educational resources on non-centralized water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions. CAWST tackles the global need for safe water and sanitation building knowledge and skills at the local level. As an expert in Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS), CAWST has extensive and in-depth knowledge of technologies, approaches, program implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

Find the CAWST logo here.