Democratic Republic of the Congo – Kasai

Case Study Context

Country: Democratic Republic of Congo
Context: Internal Displacement in Kasai
Organisation: Medair
Point Person: Tom Russell, WASH Advisor, Medair & Anna Mutula, Trainer (responses from Anna)
Duration of Training: 1 day
Number of People Trained: 3 WASH staff and a security officer
Duration of Data Collection: 3 days
Number of Locations: 3 villages where IDPs live

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

The Wash’Em tools are strategic, fast and easy to learn. Based on testimonies from the staff I trained, the other tools that they are used to using require many days to conduct. They felt that the other tools didn’t really allow them to become aware of the real problems faced by the community. But the Wash’Em tools, on the other hand, have very clear questions and create a climate of trust between the assessor and participant, which allows you to understand the problem and its solution. This has also allowed us to know what exactly the community needs. With KAP questionnaires, the questions are only superficial and the answers are taken out of context. That’s why organizations always think of ‘sensitizing’ the population over and over again even though they are already aware. Wash’Em helps to focus on the behavioural part that is missing.
 

The Wash’Em tools are strategic, fast and easy to learn. Wash’Em helps to focus on the behavioural part that is missing.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

With Medair, I have conducted  two assessments using the Wash’Em tools in Kasai and Goma. These are very different regions with people facing different issues. But I realised that the activities NGOs are doing in Goma are the same as in Kasai: ‘sensitization or education on handwashing’ but unfortunately that has not brought any positive results. I was surprised to realize that people know the critical moments for handwashing, and how to wash their hands (even children do); but no one was actually practicing it. This is due to unavailability of handwashing facilities, water and soap in their homes. It is great that the Wash’Em tools do also suggest a response to this challenge.

CAWST in the News: World Water Day 2019

CAWST was featured in the news for sparking knowledge and action across Canada for World Water Day.

Calgary, March 22, 2019

For sparking action across Canada, CAWST was featured in multiple media channels on World Water Day.

The Weather Network

The Weather Network aired a story nationally on TV. The online story can be viewed here.

 

660 News Calgary and Edmonton

Tune into 660 News to hear the story (all day on March 22), or check out the article online. This story was also picked up by Edmonton City News.

In observance of World Water Day, CAWST spreads the word on water, with multiple events, and organizing landmarks and national monuments to light blue for the day. Pete Thomson, CAWST’s Senior Director of Training & Consulting, was interviewed on 660 News and talked about this important issue:

World Water Day draws attention to the fact that whoever you are, wherever you are, water is a human right, and it is a big issue in the world right now.

In the world, right now, there are approximately 2.1 billion people (about a third of the world’s population) that don’t have access to safe, readily available water. That’s something I think everybody should care about.

Canadians may not have to put much thought to having access to safe drinking water, yet the daily reality for nearly a third of the world’s population is very different. As Pete shared in the interview, “In the world, right now, there are approximately 2.1 billion people, about a third of the world’s population, that doesn’t have access to safe, readily available water. That’s something I think everybody should care about.”

We are Water

On World Water Day, CAWST premiered a short video on its social media channels, “We are Water“, which was also shared on 660 News.


The United Nations has designated March 22 as World Water Day. This year, the theme for World Water Day is “Leaving No One Behind”. This theme represents the global goal to reach all people with access to safe drinking water and recognizes that a lack of safe drinking water disproportionately affects marginalized groups.

World Water Day only happens one day a year, but here at CAWST we work on it every day! To find out more and to get involved, check out our Paint It Blue page.

Lebanon

Case Study Context

Country: Lebanon
Context: Informal settlements of Syrian refugees
Organisation: Concern Worldwide
Point Person: Olivia Leroux – WASH & Shelter Program Manager, Concern Worldwide
Duration of Training: Half a day
Number of People Trained: 2 hygiene promoters and 2 hygiene volunteers
Duration of Data Collection: 4 days
Number of Locations: 4 tented settlements

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

In Lebanon, all WASH actors use the same standards tool to assess the WASH situation in informal tented settlements. Those tools are often quantitative and not qualitative, and also time consuming.

We had been looking for something simpler instead. A qualitative tool to better understand the motivations and obstacles behind handwashing, that did not create survey fatigue among our beneficiaries.

 

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you have used for WASH assessments in crises?

Instead of asking the same standards questions about whether or not people know the 5 moments of handwashing, this tool explores the motives behind them. It tries to get a sense of how the context has evolved so that they have changed/adapted their behaviours. The tools go beyond asking whether or not people wash their hands: they help to quickly understand why people do what they do, why they develop some fears, and how their environment is impacting their practices.

The Wash’Em tools are also fun to use and people do not get bored in participating, compared to most of the traditional tools I have used before.

 

These tools go beyond asking whether or not people wash their hands: they help to quickly understand why people do what they do, why they develop some fears, and how their environment is impacting their practices.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

Here’s one example. We discovered that even if the level of knowledge related to diarrhea and handwashing is high, beneficiaries do not think that diarrhea can actually lead to death or have major health complications, meaning they do not consider diarrhea as a risk, when they reported increased diarrhea after the crisis.

This, of course, is a misconception. In the aftermath of an emergency, about 40% of all deaths are due to diarrhea.

 

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

Based on the findings, Concern Worldwide has started brainstorming about installing new handwashing facilities adapted to people with specific needs (such as elderly people, and persons with disabilities) and to children (at child height). The doors of the latrines have also been modified to feature a drawing about handwashing, to remind people to wash their hands after visiting the latrines. The drawing chosen will be based on the results of a drawing competition between the children living in the camp.

Some mirrors will also be distributed to these populations for the beautification of the handwashing space. Concern Worldwide would like also to try this tool in a location where no hygiene promotion has ever taken place, to compare the results and also adapt strategies.

As far as the other suggested activities and messages, we will be discussing them at a national level and with UNICEF, who are keen to see more innovative hygiene promotion approaches.

Zimbabwe

Case Study Context

Country: Zimbabwe
Context: Cholera Outbreak
Organisation: Action contre la Faim
Point Person: Tom Heath – WASH Advisor
Duration of Training: Half a day
Number of People Trained: 6 Hygiene Promoters
Duration of Data Collection: 1 day
Number of Locations: 1 urban cholera hotspot

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

We believed Wash’Em allowed you to understand a population, to get into the context that matters quickly, with sufficient specificity to use the information  and it gives you activities.

 

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

Wash’Em provides formative data quickly, it digs into beliefs, stories and actual practices, enabling you to develop a better picture of the day-to-day realities. It cuts quickly into the aspects that are interesting when collecting data on hygiene.
 

Wash’Em provides formative data quickly, it digs into beliefs, stories and actual practices, enabling you to develop a better picture of the day-to-day realities. It cuts quickly into the aspects that are interesting when collecting data on hygiene.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from doing the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

We found out that there was no stigma for households with cholera, that people feel out of control. From the perceptions tool we found two interesting conflicting views of risk: one group reported cholera as a spiritual matter, a curse that can only be prevented through prayer. In sharp contrast, in another group which included two people who had experienced cholera, there was more fear. In addition, we found that households who had experienced cholera re-evaluated their priorities in life and spent more time with their family and less time playing snooker!

 

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

We shared the findings with the Global WASH Cluster during cholera responses. We also tried to incorporate the recommendations into a new proposal and into our intervention strategy.

The Philippines

Case Study Context

Country: Philippines
Context: Super Typhoon Ompong Recovery
Organisation: WASH Cluster (including ACF, Oxfam, Samaritan’s Purse and UNICEF)
Point Persons: Paul Del Rosario – WASH Programme Coordinator and co-WASH Cluster lead, UNICEF
Sandra Corpuz – Hygiene Promoter, Samaritan’s Purse
Nayco Yap – WASH Coordinator ACF
Duration of Training: Half a day
Number of People Trained: 10 WASH program managers, and government
Duration of Data Collection: 2.5 days
Number of Locations: 4 rural villages

Responses from Paul Del Rosario, UNICEF

 

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

The ease and speed of gathering and analysing information compared to our usual way of collecting insights on people’s hygiene behaviour, e.g., through Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) surveys, especially in an emergency, life-saving situation where things necessarily need to be done in the shortest possible time. Potentially also cheaper compared to surveys (e.g., no need to hire enumerators, encoders, etc). We understand the tools were developed through the Global WASH Cluster, which also added to the appeal when introduced in the Philippines through the national WASH Cluster.
 

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

The process is definitely more participatory (compared to a mere survey which tends to be too stiff) and with this, there’s also the opportunity to link up with other WASH issues, for example, water and sanitation. There’s even the opportunity to link to other sectors; for example, from our pre-testing experience in typhoon-affected areas, the link between livelihoods and hygiene behaviour became more apparent.

 

The [Wash’Em tools] process is definitely more participatory (compared to a mere survey which tends to be too stiff) and with this, there’s also the opportunity to link up with other WASH issues, for example, water and sanitation. There’s even the opportunity to link to other sectors.

 

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

As co-lead of the national WASH Cluster, promotion of the tools to the wider Cluster partners for application during emergency and disaster situations. Possibly also with the wider emergency WASH stakeholders.

 
 

Responses from Sandra Corpuz, Samaritan’s Purse

 

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

The Wash’Em tools appeared to be interesting for two reasons: (1) their speed of analysis, where in a matter of 2-3 days, we could come up with a hygiene promotion program; and (2) the holistic data gathering where not only could we get information specifically about handwashing behaviour, but also other factors that affect human behaviour.

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

Unlike the KAP survey which only captures knowledge, attitude and practices, the Wash’Em tools help us gauge what are the factors driving and preventing the community from having proper hygiene practices and proper sanitation facilities. These tools help us see the bigger picture of why people are not washing their hands, so that in return, we can address these issues and get good hygiene practices results.

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

It is very common for humanitarian actors to provide the community with what we think they need. Having tried the Wash’Em tools, we appreciate the fact that more than giving them the aid to meet their basic needs based on our perspective, we can design interventions that are more sustainable and effective as they are based on their actual needs. This is what was provided by the results of the Wash’Em tools.

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

We are planning to administer the Wash’Em tools where we currently have WASH programs.

 
 

Responses from Nayco Yap, Action contre la Faim

 

Having tried the Wash’Em tools what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

In general, the tools offer a very logical and systemic approach to get evidence in the field, and a fast approximation for hygiene behaviour programs in emergencies. We had several attempts in the past to address some of the bottlenecks in the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey with the use of online platforms and real-time approaches. However, there were more misses on opportunities that we failed to look into versus what Wash’Em have achieved in a very short period. Wash’Em is not a perfect tool but it is perfect enough to address some of the issues we had with resource intensive KAPs. The appeal of the tool is pretty straightforward for those who are involved in emergency response programs. It is easy and practical to use, it involves the participation of everyone when analyzing results and you don’t need a specialist to interpret and analyse the data for you. So yes, we are keen in using Wash’Em in our emergency response.

The appeal of the tool is pretty straightforward for those who are involved in emergency response programs. It is easy and practical to use, it involves the participation of everyone when analyzing results and you don’t need a specialist to interpret and analyse the data for you. So yes, we are keen in using Wash’Em in our emergency response.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

Wash’Em provides a logical, systematic and planned approach for your hygiene behaviour programs. Beyond handwashing, Wash’Em was able to surface other issues that links handwashing practice to other sectors such as livelihoods. I believe that non-WASH people who were facilitating the Wash’Em tool were able to gain a fair understanding of the relationships between hygiene practices and other things, such as people’s livelihoods. Therefore the tools provide organizations a dynamic, creative, innovative and collaborative opportunity to discuss and design humanitarian programs. The tools are not static and they can easily draw a spontaneous response from people’s experiences, including local knowledge, without being too mechanical and predictable. However, there are areas in the tools itself and in their processes that need to be improved.

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

Action Against Hunger is responding to Wash’Em results by designing a hygiene behaviour program to address and prioritise some of the key issues in handwashing. Action Against Hunger will use Wash’Em in its future response to contribute to the knowledge base on behaviour change.

South Sudan

Case Study Context

Country: South Sudan
Context: Long-term displacement camps
Organisation: Concern Worldwide
Point Person: Eunice Whande, Hygiene Specialist, Concern Worldwide
Duration of Training: Spread across 6 days
Number of People Trained: 20 hygiene promoters (with limited literacy) and two WASH supervisors.
Duration of Data Collection: 4 days
Number of Locations: 1 camp setting

A group using the Wash'Em tools

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

We have tried other methods in our communities without really understanding handwashing, and we had been unable to plan effective activities for handwashing with soap.

Having tried the Wash’Em tools, what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

I liked the handwashing demonstration tool the most. With this tool I could get a lot of information by just watching the videos. It gives a true reflection of handwashing practices in the community. It showed how likely it really was that handwashing is practiced—unlike when using other tools where we just rely on what the interviewee says or thinks. The videos were easy to share with the team to discuss the findings, analysis and implementation. We are still using the videos for discussions and implementation of some activities. The other tools were also very helpful and much better to use than the questionnaires or group discussions I had used before.

I liked the handwashing demonstration tool the most. With this tool I could get a lot of information by just watching the videos. It gives a true reflection of handwashing practices in the community. It showed how likely it really was that handwashing is practiced—unlike when using other tools where we just rely on what the interviewee says or thinks.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

I was surprised where soap for handwashing is kept and the time it would take people to wash their hands with soap in these circumstances.

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

We will continue to use them for assessments and monitoring. We will also use the videos and the findings to facilitate handwashing discussions.

Democratic Republic of the Congo – Ebola

Case Study Context

Country: Democratic Republic of Congo
Context: Ebola prevention
Organisation: Medair
Point Person: Tom Russell, WASH Advisor, Medair
Duration of Training: Half a day
Number of People Trained: 4 WASH and M&E staff
Duration of Data Collection: 3 days
Number of Locations: 3 high risk locations within Goma city

What appealed to you about the Wash’Em tools and made your organisation want to try them?

I first came across the tools when Sian White shared them at the WEDC conference in Kenya in July of 2018. I had already been working for Medair in DR Congo since the start of the year and in my role as WASH Advisor had been tasked with reviewing our methodologies for developing behaviour change programmes. I had previously come across the RANAS methodology, but it seemed too demanding in terms of the time and resources required to be feasible for our field teams in an emergency situation. The Wash’Em tools appealed to me as they had been designed to be used where time and resources are limited, while at the same time they apply the science behind behaviour change. The idea of creating a “guiding story” on which to elaborate a communication campaign immediately appealed to me.
 

Having tried the Wash’Em tools what is different about them compared to the standard processes you used for WASH assessments in crises?

In DR Congo with regards to understanding behaviours we have been using Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) surveys, which do include some observation. Where Wash’Em is different is that, firstly it does not require as many resources in terms of time and staff. In one week we were able to both train our staff to use the Wash’Em tools as well as carry out the assessments, whereas a wide-scale household survey may take a few weeks to organise, implement and then write up. I get the sense that the Wash’Em tools provided a way to dig a little deeper into the stories of the people we met. In a typical KAP household survey, questions are quite closed as we look for yes and no answers. Whereas with the Wash’Em “Personal Histories” tool, for example, we have an opportunity to learn more about the experience the person we are meeting is going through. This seems to provide greater depth than a wide-scale household survey.

… the Wash’Em tools provided a way to dig a little deeper into the stories of the people we met. In a typical KAP household survey, questions are quite closed as we look for yes and no answers. Whereas with the Wash’Em “Personal Histories” tool, for example, we have an opportunity to learn more about the experience the person we are meeting is going through. This seems to provide greater depth than a wide-scale household survey.

 

Give an example of one particularly interesting insight you gained from using the Wash’Em tools or something you wouldn’t otherwise have known.

In my role as a WASH Advisor I particularly appreciated the opportunity to see how handwashing was practiced through the review of the Handwashing Demonstration videos that the team collected from the field. Being able to observe the practical challenges that people face in the home with regards to handwashing helped me appreciate that how focusing on promoting the construction and use of simple low-cost handwashing stations could play a key role in increasing the number of people regularly washing their hands with soap.
 

How does your organisation intend to use the findings?

We intend to use the findings in our Ebola prevention work in Goma. We will use the findings from the Motives tool to help create a guiding story for which our messaging will link to. The Touchpoint tool has helped us to confirm the most effective communication channels to use, confirming that social media is likely to be the most effective. We are keen to try out the Wash’Em tools across the different settings where we work in DR Congo. Our first trial took place in the city of Goma, where there is a theoretical risk of Ebola reaching the inhabitants. We intend to use the tools in settings where people have been displaced. and if possible. where people have experienced Ebola directly.

Coffee with CAWST: An IWD Feature with Lemlem Kebede

In the spirit of International Women’s Day, we sat down with one of our outstanding team members, Lemlem Zeleke, to discuss the importance of monitoring and evaluation in delivering effective WASH interventions to reach vulnerable populations, such as women and children. Monitoring and evaluation might sound pretty formidable to you (and they are!) so grab a cup of coffee and read on.

Image: Alberta Council for Global Cooperation (ACGC)

International Women’s Day 2019 is on Friday, March 8, and it’s a day to celebrate the diverse achievements of women, and to accelerate gender equality. We’re taking this opportunity to celebrate one of the talented individuals with whom we work, and to talk about how we can accelerate gender equality in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Women and girls are some of the most vulnerable populations that we must consider when designing WASH interventions. If you want to learn more about the impacts of water, sanitation and hygiene for maternal and child health, check out our fact sheet.

In the spirit of International Women’s Day, we sat down with one of our outstanding team members, Lemlem Zeleke Kebede, to discuss the importance of monitoring and evaluation in delivering effective WASH interventions to reach vulnerable populations, such as women and children. A little background on Lemlem: She has over a decade of relief and development experience in planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating hygiene and sanitation promotion programs for refugees, local communities, and internally displaced people.

Lemlem champions the collection, monitoring, and evaluation of WASH projects to impact health outcomes for women, children, and other vulnerable populations. Before moving to Calgary, she worked at CAWST’s Water Expertise and Training Centre in Ethiopia, Ethiopian Kale Heywot Church Development Commission. She is now a Knowledge & Research Advisor here at CAWSTand a monitoring and evaluation master (though she would never tell you that herself). Monitoring and evaluation might sound pretty formidable to you (and they are!) so grab a cup of coffee and read on: Lemlem brings an inspiring mix of passion, focus, insight, and methodology to CAWST and our clients.

Who is a female role model that you look up to and why?

When I worked in Ethiopia at the International Rescue Committee, there were two WASH technical advisors on the team whom I especially admired, Dorothy Peprah and Penninah Mathenge. They were strong and supportive, and they encouraged me to do my job better. They coached and mentored me over the years to improve the quality of my knowledge and skills. I aspire to be like Dorothy and Penninah—they were confident, smart, and eloquent.

Tell us about how you got into WASH, and especially the monitoring and evaluation of WASH projects.

I started my career in Ethiopia as an elementary school teacher, then went on to teach a high school biology. I loved to teach, but my real passion was development. I transitioned to working in WASH as a trainer with Ethiopian Kale Heywot Church (now a WET Centre). Then, I became a National WASH Advisor with IRC and it was really that role that opened me up to pursue monitoring and evaluation. At that time, I would oversee WASH projects. While we had some resources to support with monitoring and evaluation, I had a supervisor at the time who encouraged me to take courses so I could start to lead more in that field, growing professionally and with the organization. During those years, I was curious and driven to learn more about public health and to widen my perspective on approaches to development. Then in my master’s at the University of Leeds I learned about evidence-based approaches and logical models, and I’ve been able to apply these insights in my work with CAWST, especially in supporting our clients with monitoring and evaluation.

What does monitoring and evaluation entail in WASH projects? What kind of statistics can you collect?

Monitoring and evaluation of WASH projects goes hand-in-hand with other project activities, guiding the execution of the work, and determining whether the project is successful or not in different areas. The type of data we collect is based on the planned activities and our intended outcomes of the project.

Monitoring is continuous. All throughout the project activities we track inputs and outputs against how we planned the project. Monitoring helps us to ensure that we deliver on what we planned to do.

Evaluation is periodic. It allows us to look back and consider whether what we executed achieved the objectives that we intended.

For example, a we might plan to create education materials and train on technical WASH activities. In that case, we would monitor: how many materials we developed, what materials in comparison to what we planned, and whether we are actually training the people we planned to train. When we do an evaluation, we might look at whether people are using the technology we trained on correctly, continually, and consistently. If the answer is no, we seek to understand why, what are the motivational factors, and we can adjust our plans from there.

What I often see are projects that place men as the leaders of WASH facility management and construction. This assumes that women cannot participate in these elements of WASH projects, and that their role is to support the household. Women and girls are not just the passive receivers of WASH, they must be a key player in the project implementation. When we work with them to understand their specific challenges, as well as what they see as the solutions, we can create WASH interventions that suit everyone.

Tell us about a time when you saw monitoring and evaluation change the course of a project.

I just got home from a trip to Nepal, supporting our Water Expertise and Training Centre, ENPHO, to reflect on an evaluation we did and plan the next steps. The results of this evaluation are pushing us to change course. Originally, we set ambitious targets around training on household water treatment options and total sanitation; our focus to date has been on improving technical knowledge. Considering our evaluation results, we are noticing that the technical knowledge is not enough; we are not reaching households to use technology as consistently as we hoped. We’re currently still planning for our next phase of the project, but I can tell you that we will shift our focus and efforts towards behaviour change interventions. To start, these efforts may look like household visits to connect with people more directly and understand their challenges and barriers to taking action on their water, sanitation and hygiene needs.

Beyond that example, when we design projects, it’s very important that we conduct needs assessments and gender analyses. I believe this should be conducted by focusing on women, girls, men and boys. All of their needs need to be accounted for in the design of projects, and the monitoring and evaluation of projects, in order to achieve equitable WASH access. What I often see are projects that place men as the leaders of WASH facility management and construction. This assumes that women cannot participate in these elements of WASH projects, and that their role is to support the household. Women and girls are not just the passive receivers of WASH, they must be a key player in the project implementation. When we work with them to understand their specific challenges, as well as what they see as the solutions, we can create WASH interventions that suit everyone.

Another layer of this challenge happens on the implementation side. There is an overwhelming majority of males with an engineering background in the position of implementers. It’s important that we continue to encourage women to enter this field and that we support current implementers to design with a gender equity lens in mind.

 

How is monitoring and evaluation typically done in WASH projects?

I have seen a big range of how the information is collected – from pencils and notepads, to using tablets and using GIS data to find the most vulnerable areas to focus efforts in. I have supported client organizations of CAWST to innovate their ways of collecting health information and other metrics. Working with the Environment and Public Health Organization of Nepal (ENPHO) in partnership with CAWST, on the Nepali Earthquake Relief Fund, I introduced the team to use a software and tablets to collect data, shifting away from using pen and paper. This change impacted the quality of the data being collected, it increased our efficiency and capacity to collect data, and our ability to use it to adapt interventions for optimal impact.

Regardless of how the data is being collected, the most important thing to remember is the ultimate purpose of evaluation and monitoring. That is, to improve the project and to ensure that we are meeting the needs of communities we serve, in the most equitable way possible.

 

What are some of the challenges with monitoring and evaluation in WASH?

Sometimes we don’t get the results we hoped for, and that can be disheartening, but that is why we do monitoring and evaluation: to deliver more accurate and impactful services and interventions. There are a myriad of factors in achieving our goals – implementation may not work out was we planned, and we need to adjust as those factors emerge. I think we can mitigate this when we make monitoring and evaluation an integral part of the project design because it helps us to account for SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, time-bound) goals. It is all too easy to get distracted by the results we think are appealing.

Secondly, sometimes we become so concerned with delivering on the activities, we don’t give time and due attention to the data, which can affect the quality of the data, making it hard to use.

Lastly, in designing projects with monitoring and evaluation in mind, we sometimes get distracted by the nice-to-know data. It’s so common now to have lots of data available to us, but collecting that takes time and resources. We must spend the time upfront thinking about what data is going to tell us and what is the need-to-know data.

 

What solutions does CAWST offer clients who want to learn about monitoring and evaluation?

We have a workshop on Monitoring for Improvement to help create monitoring systems and collect data required to measure project performance. We also offer consulting services to clients on how to undertake data collection, analysis, and report writing so that they limit errors and duplication.

Read more on Monitoring and Evaluation in our Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage Knowledge Base.


Tori D’Avella, BA, MSOD is a Public Engagement Officer on the Public Engagement & Donor Initiatives team at CAWST. She recently completed an MSc in Organization Development, exploring the factors that lead to resilient partnerships in sustainability and systems change initiatives. Tori has international consulting experience in Botswana, China, Costa Rica, and France. Fluent in English and Italian, Tori is a public speaking virtuoso and relishes great conversations over coffee.

Office Administrator

This position is ideal for a well-organized person who enjoys multi-tasking and working with both people and technology. To apply for this position, you must be available to come into the office a minimum of one day per week from 9 am – 1 pm.

Purpose of the Role

This position is ideal for a well-organized person who enjoys multi-tasking and working with both people and technology. Daily responsibilities include assisting CAWST with office administration duties that make it possible for things to run smoothly.

 

Duties and Responsibilities

  • Answering the phone
  • Greeting guests that come in for meetings
  • Managing couriers
  • Supporting the Director of Business Operations with upkeep of files
  • Managing office supplies
  • Supporting with select vendors
  • Other admin duties as needed

 

Orientation and Training

Training and orientation will be ongoing, and led by the Director of Business Operations

 

Skills and Qualifications

  • Experience with Microsoft Office Suite
  • Experience working in an administrative role

 

Department and Supervision:  Keri Smith, Director of Business Operations

 

Location: B12 – 6020 2 Street SE, Calgary, Alberta T2H 2L8 Canada

 

Time Requirements

  • 20 hours per week
  • Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 1 .p.m. each day
  • Can be shared by multiple volunteers, minimum commitment of one day per week

 

Start Date: As soon as possible

 

Application

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you wish to apply for this volunteer position, please contact Tori D’Avella at volunteers@cawst.org with the title of the Volunteer Position you are applying for in the subject line.  If you are new to CAWST, please fill out the Volunteer Intake Form, so we can get you started!

To apply for this position, you must be available to come into the office a minimum of one day per week from 9 am – 1 pm.

 

Additional comments   

All CAWST volunteers are (amazing!) invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. Volunteers are also invited to join in our annual Volunteer appreciation night. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and we are happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers.

Youth taking action on safe drinking water in Canada

The 2019 United Nations’ World Water Day theme Leaving No One Behind is near and dear to our mission and work at CAWST. We strive to leave no one behind by sharing knowledge and skills on water, sanitation and hygiene solutions so that individuals, households, and communities can take action. This is a story on how Wavemakers are leaving no one behind through their action project on safe drinking water in Canada.

The 2019 United Nations’ World Water Day theme Leaving No One Behind is near and dear to our mission and work at CAWST. We strive to leave no one behind by sharing knowledge and skills on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions, so that individuals, households, and communities can take action on WASH issues.

People who live in remote areas often face challenges to access water that is safe to drink and safely-managed sanitation. This is an issue in many parts of the world, including Canada. One of our Wavemakers teams took an interest in this problem and decided to be part of the solution. This article shares their experience and efforts to leave no one behind in Canada.

Coming up on March 19 at World Water Day: Youth Taking Action, you can check out this Wavemakers project and many more – RSVP now!

 

Written by Jay, Student | Ian Bazalgette School

For the past three years, students of Ian Bazalgette School have been working on the Clean Water Birthday Project. Started in recognition of Canada 150, the project aims to raise awareness and funds for the many Indigenous communities across Canada that are affected by boil-water advisories and that lack access to potable water. According to the United Nations, clean drinking water is a basic human right, yet there are still individuals in our country who suffer from inadequate access to clean drinking water.

We have taken on this problem in a multitude of ways, with our primary fundraiser being the sale of reusable plastic water bottles with our logo, facts about the cause, and links to our website. Thus far, we have raised over $1,300 by this means. All of the proceeds from our fundraisers go towards Water First, a Canada-based charity which funds and educates Indigenous Canadians on the construction and maintenance of water treatment plants. Last year, our school participated in a media-covered campaign called “We Walk for Water” in order to raise awareness for the issue. Several political figures were in attendance, including City Councillor Gian-Carlo Carra and MLA Joe Ceci. We have also created videos, posters, social media pages, and a website for the cause.

The work we have done has had a huge impact on the local and national communities. Our team has attended numerous events on behalf of our campaign, such as the CAWST Wavemakers Summit, the Calgary Eco-Leaders Conference, and Paint It Blue for World Water Day. We Walk for Water was covered by Global News, with educator Denise Hammond and student Halima Mohamed appearing to discuss Indigenous water issues. The cause has also been recognized at the federal level, with funds allocated by Finance Minister Bill Morneau in the 2018 budget. Moving forward, we plan to attend the Mayor’s Environment Expo, continue selling water bottles, and print stickers with information on our project for businesses to put on their disposable water bottles. We look forward to sharing our progress on March 19 at World Water Day: Youth Taking Action with other CAWST Wavemakers Action Project Teams and the public.

Curt Young and the Healers, a band local to Calgary, plays at the Ian Bazalgette We Walk for Water event.

Youth Volunteering Day

Volunteer on April 13th from 10:00 am to noon, and help to build a new biosand filter, which will be displayed publicly in Calgary.

Volunteer on April 13th from 10:00 am to noon, and help to build a new biosand filter, which will be displayed publicly in Calgary.

Volunteers will have the chance to meet CAWST staff and hear about their various roles, learn about the biosand filter, and contribute towards our public engagement campaign. Sign Up Here!

CAWST in the News: ACGC’s Top 30 Under 30 for 2019

Happy International Development Week! CAWST is pleased to highlight the up-and-comers in international development featured in this year’s ACGC’s Top 30 Under 30 magazine. One of our staff and one of our volunteers made the list!

Happy International Development Week!

As a member organization of the Alberta Council for Global Cooperation (ACGC), CAWST is excited to highlight the up-and-comers in international development who are acknowledged in the ACGC 2019 Top 30 Under 30 magazine. This publication is released annually to share stories of people from Alberta, and those working with their member organizations abroad, who are acting on solutions to the development challenges we face globally. This year, the theme for International Development Week and the ACGC Top 30 is SDG 5: Gender Equality.

It is inspiring and encouraging to learn about the outstanding achievements of these 30 young people who are acting on their vision of a brighter future for our world. We are especially proud that two of our very own -Stephanie Southgate, who is one of our staff members, and Gideon Mentie, one of our public engagement volunteers- are among those recognized in the 2019 ACGC Top 30 Under 30.

Congratulations to all of them!

 

Stephanie Southgate, our Wavemakers Program Manager, is recognized for her outstanding work engaging youth to take action on water, sanitation and hygiene. Through Wavemakers workshops and mentoring, Stephanie has sparked passion and inspired action of thousands of youth in Alberta, increasing awareness of gender equality through access to safe drinking water and safely managed sanitation.

 

 

 

 

 

Gideon Mentie is one of CAWST’s volunteers, supporting Wavemakers and other public engagement activities, while he pursues his civil engineering degree at the University of Calgary. A former Junior Citizen of the Year in Brooks, Gideon aspires to be a changemaker in water resource management and is especially driven to working towards a world where public institutions, such as schools and hospitals, have safe drinking water and medical equipment sterilization.

On behalf of CAWST, congratulations to Stephanie and Gideon on their well-deserved acknowledgement. We are fortunate to have the opportunity to work with ACGC and our fellow members to encourage young leaders like Stephanie and Gideon, as we all work together to achieve the Global Goals.

Get #DevInspired this International Development Week and read the latest ACGC Top 30 Under 30 magazine here.

Want to meet these young leaders, along with many more? Join us for an evening of celebration of youth action on access to safe drinking water and sanitation, March 19 from 5 to 7 pm, for World Water Day.

Hope, happiness, and health through water knowledge

To celebrate International Development Week (IDW), here’s an inspiring story of how Canada is helping to address water, sanitation, and hygiene issues around the world! It begins and ends in Afghanistan, and involves not just Canada but also Denmark and Pakistan.

Every year, the first full week of February marks International Development Week (IDW), which highlights Canadian contributions to poverty reduction and international humanitarian assistance. To celebrate IDW, we are excited to share this inspiring story of how, through CAWST’s work developing capacity of local training organizations and WET Centre partners, Canada is helping to address water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) issues around the world. It begins and ends in Afghanistan, and involves not just Canada but also Pakistan and Denmark.

 

I heard this story shortly after joining CAWST, on a work trip to Afghanistan, where I was offering training and consulting support. On meeting DACAAR’s Deputy WET Centre Manager, Dr. Shir Ahmed, we talked about work and family. He has six children; I have one. When I asked Dr. Ahmed what motivates him daily in his difficult line of work, he showed me these photos and shared the story behind them.

 

Afghanistan, circa 2009

For three years, Bismillah searched for a doctor who could explain why his daughter, Tabbasum, so frequently suffered from diarrhea and abdominal bloating. Although he regularly sacrificed going to work to take care of his daughter, he was helpless in stopping her health from deteriorating. “I am only a stonemason so my daily income was not enough to cover both my family’s needs and Tabbasum’s treatment,” Bismillah told Dr. Ahmed. “I was facing a huge problem because I had to feed my family but I was forced to choose between making a living and taking care of my daughter.” She would recover for a while after taking medications, only to get sick again and again. Whatever the root cause was, medicines were not stopping it.

As fathers ourselves, Dr. Ahmed and I could not begin to imagine Bismillah’s despair and helplessness, watching his daughter grow weaker day by day, and having to choose between working and taking care of his daughter, between food and medication. A common problem in low and middle-income countries, diarrhea can be deadly. It kills 842,000 people every year, including 1,000 children under 5 each day. [1]


This pond in a village in northern Afghanistan is a water source for many local families. The water is sometimes consumed untreated. 

Through chronic diarrhea, young Tabbasum’s health became so poor that her father feared he might lose her at any moment.

Nobody in his circle of friends and family knew what to do, but Bismillah heard about a good doctor who lived in Pakistan. Desperate to save his daughter’s life, he decided to travel 700 km over mountainous terrain to find him. He found a doctor who explained that his daughter’s illness was caused by drinking contaminated water. When he returned, Bismillah had a clear diagnosis, although he wasn’t sure what -if anything- he could possibly do about it, with his limited financial resources.

From Denmark and Canada, 2012

It was at this point that hope arrived. Hygiene educators from the Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees (DACAAR) visited Bismillah’s village, to share knowledge on affordable household water treatment methods.

Does the name DACAAR ring a bell? Perhaps it’s because we often talk about them: DACAAR is our WET Centre partner in Afghanistan. Our organizations launched this partnership in 2011. DACAAR is among the largest WASH-focused agencies in Afghanistan; they have worked there since 1984. So far, more than 1.2 million people have better water or sanitation as a result of projects implemented by DACAAR’s clients. Bismallah is one of them.

Afghanistan, 2013

Thanks to the knowledge he gained from the DACAAR hygiene educators, Bismillah gradually learned how to protect the water source, how to treat and safely store water, and how to build, use and maintain a biosand filter in his home. Since then, Tabassum and her family don’t have to drink untreated water anymore! They also benefit from regular visits and ongoing support from DACAAR. Bismallah’s family drinks clean water now, and Tabbasum has recovered her health.


Bismillah and Tabbasum now have access to clean water that is safe to drink.

Happiness

In Arabic, “Tabassum” means smile or happiness. Talk about a fitting name! Hope, happiness and healthy homes are the reasons why I do what I do. I often think about this young father and his daughter, and how water knowledge has made a difference in their lives.

These images inspire me because they illustrate how water knowledge empowers people like Bismillah and Tabbasum to have clean water that is safe to drink. Through our work developing life-saving knowledge and skills via CAWST’s in-country local partnerships and client networks, Canada is helping parents and children in households around the world to have clean, safe water. We are making happiness, hope, and healthy homes a daily possibility for girls like Tabassum.

 
 

Inspired?

 

Suneel Rajavaram, MEng, PGDRM, IPMP, is a Global WASH Advisor on CAWST’s Training and Consulting team. He has worked extensively in providing training and technical support for water and sanitation projects in numerous countries, including Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Canada, Ethiopia, India, Malawi, Nepal, Pakistan, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, and the USA. Suneel and his wife Padma grew up in India and now live in Canada; they have a son who is studying to become an engineer.


References

[1] Prüss-Ustün, A., Bartram, J., Clasen, T., Colford, J. M., Cumming, O., Curtis, V., et al. (2014). Burden of disease from inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene in low- and middle-income settings: a retrospective analysis of data from 145 countries. Tropical Medicine & International Health, 19(8), 894–905. http://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12329

World Water Day Event Support

CAWST’s annual World Water Day event offers an opportunity to explore local and global water issues, with a showcase of CAWST’s Youth Wavemakers action projects. The event takes place from 5:00-7:00 pm on Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 at SAIT.  Volunteers are crucial to the success of our events, and we are looking for dedicated individuals to join our World Water Day team.

Purpose of the Role:

CAWST’s annual World Water Day event offers an opportunity to explore local and global water issues, with a showcase of CAWST’s Youth Wavemakers action projects. The event takes place from 5:00-7:00 pm on Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 at SAIT.

Volunteers are crucial to the success of our events, and we are looking for dedicated individuals to join our World Water Day team.

Duties and Responsibilities:

Photographers (2 positions, 4:30-7)

  • Capture the excitement of the event for CAWST publications and social media
  • Photography experience is required
  • CAWST can provide a digital SLR camera

Photo Booth (2 positions, 4:00-7:30)

  • Set up and take down the photo booth
  • Encourage attendees to use the photo booth
  • Assist attendees in picking out props and arranging the shot

Registration and Information Booth (3 positions, 4:00 pm – 7:30 pm)

  • Support set-up and take down of Registration Booth
  • Welcome attendees and provide an overview of the evening
  • Maintain guest list and attendee numbers
  • Explain water droplet activity to guests, and hand out paper water drops

Kids Colouring Table (2 positions, 4:00 – 7:30 pm)

  • Support the set up and take down of the kids colouring table
  • Assist children with colouring and giving out stamps
  • Facilitate the 3 pile sort game
  • Maintain a safe environment for young kids

Make Your Own Button Booth (2 positions, 4:00 pm – 7:30 pm)

  • Support the set up and take down of the Make your Own Button Booth
  • Help attendees make their own buttons
  • Maintain a safe environment for young kids

Get Involved Table (2 positions, 4:00pm -7:30pm)

  • Encourage guests to Pledge to Take Action
  • Let people know how they can get involved with CAWST

Poop Toss Table (1 position, 4:00-7:30)

  • Assist kids (and adults) with our fun and engaging poop toss table activity
  • Share knowledge on the relationship between sanitation and safe drinking water

Walter the Water Drop or Icky the Poo Mascots (2 positions, 5:00-7:00)

  • Wear our Walter the Water Drop Costume, or Icky the Poo Costume
  • Circulate around the event, giving high-fives to young kids and posing in pictures when requested

Take Down (3 positions, 7:00- 8:00)

  • Support CAWST staff to take down the event
  • Support the Youth Wavemakers in packing up their materials
  • Ensure that event space is properly prepared and safe for the general public, and that a ‘leave no trace’ policy is adhered to at the end of day

Orientation and Training:

A mandatory one-hour orientation held at the CAWST office in Calgary, or delivered through a webinar (to be determined depending on availability).

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Outgoing and engaging
  • Ability to lift and carry (set up & take down teams: up to 50 pounds)
  • Knowledge about CAWST or a willingness to learn about our organization
  • Knowledge about the international WASH sector, and/or international development issues

Department and Supervision:  Public Engagement & Donor Initiatives

Location: Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT), Irene Lewis Atrium, Stan Grad Centre, Building M on the SAIT Campus Map

Parking:

  • The closest parking lot is P2. Your parking will be free for the event. More details to come. Volunteers are also encouraged to take the C-train as there is a stop located at SAIT.

Time Requirements:

  • Event: Tuesday March 19, 4:00 – 8:00 pm (Time varies with volunteer roles)

Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you wish to apply for this volunteer position, you can sign up for a shift or contact Amanda Deis at adeis@cawst.org with the title of the volunteer position you are applying for in the subject line.  If you are new to CAWST, please complete the Volunteer Sign up Form so we can get you started!

Additional comments:       

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4 day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours.  CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers.

World Water Day: Youth Taking Action

Join us to Paint it Blue and celebrate local youth taking action on global water issues. On March 19, from 5 – 7 pm CAWST partners with SAIT for a World Water Day showcase of youth action on water solutions. Located at SAIT’s Irene Lewis Atrium.

Join us to Paint it Blue and celebrate local youth taking action on global water issues. On March 19, from 5 – 7 pm CAWST partners with SAIT for a World Water Day showcase of youth action on water solutions and ways that you can get involved. Enjoy interactive displays, delicious snacks, and engaging speakers. This is an all-ages event at SAIT’s Irene Lewis Atrium, 1301 16 Ave NW, Calgary, AB, T2M 0L4.

A Toast to David Manz, Humanitarian Superhero

Colleagues, friends and family gathered recently to celebrate Dr. David Manz, CAWST’s co-founder and the inventor of the revolutionary biosand filter that has been instrumental in providing clean water to millions of people all over the world.

“Dave’s a humanitarian superhero,” says John Clayton, Director of Programs with Samaritan’s Purse Canada, about Dr. David Manz; inventor, humanitarian, and co-founder of CAWST.

David Manz, AOE, inventor of the biosand filter and founder of CAWST

Colleagues, friends and family gathered recently to celebrate Dr. David Manz, inventor of the revolutionary biosand filtration technology that’s been instrumental in providing clean water to millions of people all over the world. The evening was much more than a celebration of Dave as a “superhero;” it celebrated the extended network of people who support and believe in a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Emceed by Rick Castiglione, the evening hosted about 150 people hearing stories about Manz, his biosand filter, and the lasting impacts of his humanitarian legacy. “Superhero Dave’s archvillain is the femme fatale, acute diarrhea, and his superhero suit is made of ‘schmutzdeke’ (meaning dirty blanket) that repels all the villainous pathogens,” says Clayton affectionately.

The praise for Dr. Manz was long, and heartfelt. “I’m really touched to be part of this,” says Shauna Curry, CAWST CEO. “The very essence of CAWST’s vision surrounds David’s invention and his willingness to share it.”

a festive ice biosand filter made by CAWST staff
Yes, that’s an ice biosand filter made by our staff.

Mayor Naheed Nenshi conveyed his kind words in a video message.

CAWST’s co-founder, Camille Dow-Baker, also sent her admiration from her home in Tobago: “On behalf of millions of people, thank you David for caring so much.”

The mood was festive as people mingled and enjoyed a delicious assortment of appetizers, drinks and an ice biosand filter display. The most special moments were the shared stories of personal times with Manz, and the impact of water knowledge and the biosand filter.

The crowd was treated to a mix of past students, friends, and colleagues taking turns at the mic sharing their stories of their work and friendship with Dr. Manz. “Dr. Manz was not just innovative. He faced the impossible, and proved its possibilities,” said Candice Young-Rojanschi, Knowledge & Research Advisor at CAWST, whose doctoral research involved the biosand filter and household water treatment.

Barry Stewart and his wife Pat were part of the well-wishers. “I had the honour of being the first chairman of the board at CAWST, back in 2001,” says Barry. “It’s really exciting to be here and see the progress and success.”

The sense of belonging to something much greater than ourselves was clear at the event. It honoured the many ways many people share the Gift of Water knowledge, from supporting CAWST, to dispersing biosand filters internationally, to being the supportive family of someone like Dr. Manz.

“Dr. Manz was not just innovative. He faced the impossible, and proved its possibilities,” says Candice Young-Rojanschi“Dr. Manz was not just innovative. He faced the impossible, and proved its possibilities,” said Candice Young-Rojanschi, Knowledge & Research Advisor at CAWST

Recently inducted into the Alberta Order of Excellence, Dr. David Manz has been sharing the Gift of Water knowledge for more than 30 years now. Over those years, he has collected friends and followers who contribute to and are part of this global community.

CAWST’s Tal Woolsey summed up the evening: “As David often says: ‘If you could do something good, why wouldn’t you?’”

 

 


Learn more about how you can do something good today too.

Photos by Lindsay Sullivan, one of our talented volunteers.

All in a clay’s work for clean water with ceramic pot filters

In partnership with Potters for Peace, CAWST co-developed and co-delivered an intensive course on ceramic pot filter production. Ceramic pot filters are an affordable technology that can be locally produced. When implemented correctly, consistently, and continuously, they provide safe drinking water at the point-of-use. 

Ceramic Pot Water Filter - CAWST
Producing quality ceramic pot filters requires specialized skills. Developing technical household water treatment knowledge and skills, and sharing them with others? That’s right in CAWST’s wheelhouse.

In partnership with Potters for Peace, CAWST co-developed a hands-on course in Ceramic Pot Filter production, and last September we co-facilitated it together at Adamah Art Studios in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, USA. We designed this two-week intensive course to address a lack of quality ceramic pot filters, misconceptions about scope and investment required to start a ceramic filter factory, and to provide timely and efficient technical support. Through this course, participants learned how to establish a ceramic pot water filter factory from the ground up, improve an existing one, or prepare to work globally to increase water quality. Check out a blog post and photo album on the Potters for Peace website.

The course was a huge success! Twelve people attended; some as part of organizations, and some as individuals. They came from all around the world: Côte d’Ivoire, Nepal, Puerto Rico, the USA, and Canada. Equipped with fresh insights, connections, knowledge, and skills, they are planning to open factories in the Philippines, Indonesia, Haiti, and the DRC.

This workshop was the culmination of two years of teamwork between Potters for Peace and CAWST”, says Lisa Mitchell, Director of Training & Consulting at CAWST. “Ceramic pot filters are an affordable technology that can be locally produced. When implemented correctly, consistently, and continuously, they provide safe drinking water at the point-of-use. In addition to increasing the knowledge and skills of participants in ceramic filter production, the course created a strong network of individuals who will support one another in starting and improving filter factories.

Learn more about ceramic pot water filters

Locally produced ceramics have been used to filter water for hundreds of years. Water is poured into a porous ceramic filter pot and is collected in another container after it passes through the ceramic pot. This system also provides safe storage until the water is used. Ceramic pot filters are usually made from clay mixed with a combustible material like sawdust or rice husks. Pots are coated in colloidal silver to provide an added layer of protection. Colloidal silver is an antibacterial that helps in pathogen inactivation, as well as preventing growth of bacteria within the filter itself.

In response to high demand, we’ll be offering this workshop again in 2019. Interested in signing up for the next one? Sign up for quarterly technical WASH updates or free webinars, and add our upcoming workshops page to your bookmarks.

Are you looking to train others on ceramic pot filters? Our open-content education and training resources, including a Ceramic Pot Filter Fact Sheet are just a click away on CAWST’s WASH resources website. You can also find -and share!- lots of technical information on ceramic pot filters and other household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products and technologies in our HWTS Knowledge base at hwts.info.

 

Looking for technical WASH support?

We’re here to help:

  • Contact CAWST for support on using and adapting our education and training resources for your work.
  • Contact Potters for Peace for support in establishing or improving a ceramic filter production facility.

Multibarrier approach to HWTS - Ceramic Pot Filter

Global Learning Advisor

Do you want to support clients to provide effective training on water, sanitation, and hygiene? Are you looking for a new challenge and a novel way to apply your instructional design, training, and facilitation skills? We are looking for an exceptional individual with experience in training, instructional design, water, and sanitation, to develop the capacity of our clients globally.

Do you want to support clients to provide effective training on water, sanitation, and hygiene? Are you looking for a new challenge and a novel way to apply your instructional design, training, and facilitation skills? We are looking for an exceptional individual with experience in training, instructional design, water, and sanitation, to build the capacity of our clients globally.

The Position: Global Learning Advisor.

Reports to: Directors of Training and Consulting.

Type: Full time, permanent.

Location: The position is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. International travel is typically four trips per year. Up to 50% of your time will be spent overseas.

Compensation: Salary will be discussed in the personal interview. Please include salary expectations in your cover letter.

Position start date: As soon as possible.

Application Due Date: Applications will be reviewed on a continuous basis until the position is filled. Only resumes of applicants who are legally permitted to work in Canada will be reviewed.

 

Position Summary

The Global Learning Advisor is part of CAWST’s Training and Consulting team. In this position, you will work directly with clients and staff to increase their capacity to effectively design, develop, deliver, and evaluate WASH training. You will support trainers to improve their skills through a competency development process and work with clients to co-develop training materials. You will feedback these experiences to our Research & Learning and our Virtual Services teams, to support them in the design of relevant and timely online and face-to-face training materials.

This is a demanding role that requires a creative, motivated, and enthusiastic individual who wants to contribute to building the capacity of WASH educators globally. The ideal candidate will have a proven track record of instructional design, with a focus on content for global audiences, as well as extensive experience developing and delivering workshops or courses for participants from low-income countries.


Specific Areas of Responsibility

  1. Training, Coaching, and Mentoring (40%)
  • Train partners, clients and staff using a variety of methods including workshops, mentoring, peer support, and apprenticeship to effectively:
    • deliver workshops on WASH
    • design workshops on WASH
    • adapt or customize content for a specific client context
  • Develop and maintain strong client relationships, building and sustaining credibility with your clients and potential clients.
  • Support CAWST staff to effectively deliver online and face-to-face training in WASH.
  • Contribute to the delivery of our semi-annual Learning Exchanges to support professional development, knowledge sharing, and feedback within CAWST and client networks.
  • Prepare and deliver webinars, online courses, and training workshops.

 

  1. Instructional Design (20%)
  • Support the design, development, evaluation, and improvement of CAWST’s education and training materials.
  • Develop competency frameworks for different roles in the WASH sector.
  • Develop online and face-to-face training programs for effective knowledge transfer that results in action leading to safe water and sanitation.
  • Develop digital learning tools suitable for clients in low-income countries.

 

  1. Developing Capacity of Local Partners (20%)
  • Work with local partner organizations to build their skills and capabilities so they can replicate CAWST’s capacity development services for client organizations.
  • Identify potential new local partner organizations within the region or countries of responsibility.
  • Work together with local partner organizations to develop strategy and plans, and seek funding for their development.
  • Act as project manager, as appropriate, and take responsibility for the capacity development process with the local partner.

 

  1. Business Development (15% of the time)
  • Research and prepare country and regional strategies.
  • Develop a strong understanding of country contexts, client organizations, and key water and sanitation issues.
  • Identify potential training, networking, and client support opportunities.
  • Seek funding to support your operations plan, working closely with the Fund Development team.
  • Contribute to funding proposals that include programs in your region or area of expertise.
  • Develop relationships with potential funders in your countries of responsibility.

 

  1. Operations Planning, Reporting (~5% of the time)
  • Develop and execute strategies and plans to develop leading, water, sanitation, and hygiene education and training programs.
  • Understand and contribute as appropriate to CAWST’s operations and business services cycle (e.g., department operations planning, monthly operations reports, budget reconciliations, timesheets, and trip reports).

Any other duties and responsibilities as may be required.

 

Education

  • A bachelor’s or graduate degree in instructional design, education, adult education, or equivalent.
  • Preference given to those with a second degree, diploma, or equivalent training in engineering, science, or public health.
  • Certified Training and Development Practitioner (CTDP) designation is an asset.

 

Experience

Ideal candidates have the following experience:

  • International development and education (2-5 years) with focus on at least one of the following areas: capacity development, participatory training, instructional design, effective facilitation skills, mentoring, and coaching.
  • Designing, developing, delivering, and evaluating participatory adult learning workshops or courses.
  • Working in water, sanitation, and hygiene sector in low-income countries is an asset.
  • Experience designing and delivering online training is an asset.

 

Skills and Attributes

You are well suited for this role if you are:

  • Passionate about safe water and sanitation, and your values align with CAWST’s mission and vision.
  • Able to communicate complex ideas in simple and engaging ways.
  • Able to think creatively about challenges, resolve issues, and seek support when necessary.
  • Innovative, flexible, and open to change.
  • Able to balance and manage your own workload according to established business priorities and timelines.
  • Professional and diplomatic; work well independently, within teams, and across teams.
  • Able to quickly establish credibility with others.
  • Proficient in MS Office (e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint).

 

Language

  • Excellent communications in English and French, written and verbal, with the ability to target a variety of cross-cultural audiences.
  • Fluent written and spoken Spanish is an asset.

 

To Apply

Please apply by sending your cover letter, resume, and completed questionnaire to cawstHR@cawst.org. Applications will be reviewed on a continuous basis until the position is filled. Only resumes from candidates legally permitted to work in Canada will be reviewed; and only those applicants granted an interview will be contacted. No phone calls, please.

 

Questionnaire

Please answer all questions to the best of your ability. Be as specific as possible and try to keep each answer under half a page.

  1. What has motivated you to consider working at CAWST?
  2. What excites you most about this particular role at CAWST?
  3. What is your philosophy on education and training? Please support your answer with an example you have of developing and delivering face-to-face training, preferably for an audience in a low-income country.
  4. What are your long-term career goals and aspirations? Where do you see yourself in five years?

Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 14.9 million people get better water or sanitation.

  • Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.
  • Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions, and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

The Financial Post newspaper named CAWST one of the Top 23 Charities in Canada in 2017. Read the article.

Testing the Wash’Em tools in the acute phase of a cholera outbreak

Tom Heath, WASH Technical Advisor at Action contre la Faim, is one of the key team members in the WASH’Em project. In this blog post, Tom shares his recent experience in Zimbambwe testing the WASH’Em Rapid Assessment Tools.

Tom Heath, WASH Technical Advisor at Action contre la Faim, is one of the key team members in the WASH’Em project. In this blog post, Tom shares his recent experience in Zimbambwe testing the WASH’Em Rapid Assessment Tools.

I’ve been working in the WASH sector for 9 years across 12 countries. Yet, one thing that hasn’t changed in all this time is the way we do hygiene programs. Whether it is drought response in Ethiopia, conflict response in Iraq, or a cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe, our hygiene interventions tend to look the same. They involve house to house visits where we teach people about disease transmission. If crisis-affected populations are lucky, we leave them with some soap – if they are less lucky, an educational leaflet. Then Global Handwashing Day rolls around and we organize mass handwashing events in schools and all the children get handwashing themed shirts. Interventions like this are well intended but we have no evidence that they actually work to change behaviour.

As a result of a recent collaboration between Action contre la Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) I am optimistic that as a sector we can do better. Now I find myself putting that belief to the test. I am standing next to 200 broiler chickens as we record a middle-aged mother wash her hands in the middle of cholera hot-spot zone in Harare.

Zimbabwe officially declared an outbreak of cholera on September 6th and a week later they elevated this to a state of emergency. Zimbabwe has had a sporadic history of cholera, often linked to economic and political instability – but the last outbreak was a decade ago. As of 28th October this year there were 9850 cases and 46 deaths. Cholera Treatment Centres were in place and there was a plan to reach 1.5 million Zimbabweans with the cholera vaccine. However, to stop an outbreak of this scale we also needed to get people washing their hands with soap. Rather than using the same old hygiene promotion approaches we decided to try something new – the Wash’Em Rapid Assessment Tools. These are a set of five tools which are designed to explore handwashing behavioural determinants and facilitate the design of rapid, evidence-based and context specific programs.

It’s really hard to assess handwashing practice, if you ask, no one will actually admit that they don’t wash their hands. Even if you probe or ask to see the soap, it’s hard to tease out the real practice. So reported behaviour is always much higher than reality. The ‘gold standard’ is to conduct extended observations, but this can still be biased and it is not feasible within the time limitations of emergency program design. Instead the Wash’Em approach includes a Handwashing Demonstration tool.

That’s why I find myself in this lady’s house, videoing her has she lathers her hands with soap and rinses them in the handwashing facility near the toilet. We had asked her to demonstrate how she usually washes her hands after going to the toilet. We don’t expect her to show us ‘normal’ behaviour, instead we assume that she will show us her ideal version of handwashing. Later our team sit around a table in the office and play the video recording back. We are looking for barriers in the physical environment that may prevent her from regularly being able to wash her hands. We notice that her daughter had to bring the soap from inside the house – that doesn’t seem very convenient. We notice that the liquid soap used for handwashing is actually designed for dishwashing – we wonder how often it is used for the former purpose. We also notice that the handwashing basin is actually more of a laundry basin. Does handwashing still happen when neighbours have the sink full of their dirty clothes? We do these handwashing demonstrations with 11 households; some households who had been personally affected by cholera and some who had not. Eleven might seem like a small sample size, certainly smaller than a typical needs assessment survey. But these are qualitative tools and our team were surprised that we had definitely reached saturation point with just these few households – there were clear patterns in the types of infrastructure available, where the soap was kept and how hands were washed. Overall the method itself was easy to do, extremely quick, and much more fun than a standard survey. Analyzing the recordings takes a little while to get the hang of – it requires you to think beyond what you first see. This is why the videos are really helpful. It allowed us to watch the handwashing process repeatedly, as many times as was necessary.

A few compounds away from the chickens, some of the other members of our team are in a household where the husband is recovering from cholera. They are going through the Personal History tool with him. The structured and participatory nature of this tool seems to cut through the guff, clearing the way for honest exchanges. We learn about the man’s hopes and dreams, his social life, how others view him, and how getting cholera has affected his hygiene practices. He explains to us that getting cholera had caused him to revalue many things in life. It made him reprioritize spending time with his family and as such he is cutting back on nights out playing snooker with his mates!

I find myself realizing that in all my years of experience I have never really taken time to learn about the people behind the outbreak. As a sector we rarely put a face to the statistics that we often focus on. By doing this activity with multiple people we became more aware of the sensitivities of program design in an emergency like this. We tried to think of ways that we could bring out the voices and perspectives of cholera cases during our intervention.

We get back to the car and catch up with the members of our team who were conducting the focus group discussions. I ask them about one of methods they tried with their participants – the Motives tool. “It was out of this world!” they exclaim! As part of this activity participants are introduced to character cards, each with different personalities. The group then rank the characters in order, from the person who is most likely to wash their hands to the person who is least likely. Is it the person who is a good parent, the person who is well educated, or the person who values looking nice? The tool plays with stereotypes and you get a lively discussion. The male focus group was particularly dynamic and ended up sharing stories about similar people in their community in order to explain the order they had chosen. Why does all this matter? This tool helps you identify the goal-oriented motives driving handwashing behaviour. Knowing this can help you tell stories which will inspire the population you are working with to wash their hands.

In the focus group discussions we also tried the two other tools – Risk Perceptions and Touchpoints. In the Risk Perception activity participants are asked to use a coloured scale to describe their perceived vulnerability and susceptibility to cholera. The team explain to me that the two focus groups responded very differently to this activity. In the first group people were worried about other health issues like TB and cancer. Several participants explained that in their view cholera is a spiritual matter, a curse that can only be prevented through prayer. In sharp contrast, another group included two people who had experienced cholera within their households and they were very afraid.

The last tool, Touchpoints, is very intervention focused and helps you to identify the delivery channels that will be best placed to reach your population. We learned that in this urban area almost everyone watches TV and listens to radio, and most households have one person with a smartphone. Newspapers, on the other hand, were only for the rich, We also learned that in urban areas like this, community meetings didn’t happen in a centralized formal space. Before using this tool, we had had an idea to do outreach at bus stops. Fortunately, this is one of the delivery channels assessed by the Touchpoints tool, which corroborated our idea. It seems that no matter who you are -man, woman or child- you make your way through a bus stop most days. This, we decided, was going to be the focus of our intervention.

An effective emergency response requires managing competing priorities. When I had first arrived in Harare I immediately felt that familiar pressure of needing to act – feeling like I was there to save lives and that there could be no delay. With many other tasks calling out to me it was tempting to push the Wash’Em tools aside and just go with our normal programming approach. But having seen so many hygiene programs done badly I knew that actually we may not be running out there to save lives – we may be running out there to no effect at all. It took me half a day to train my team on the Wash’Em tools and just one day to collect the data with a team of six – in my mind that is an acceptable and effective use of time in any response.

I loved using the Wash’Em rapid assessment tools. Our team worked together to translate the findings into an intervention with some support from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. We returned with our data on Thursday and by Monday we had a full outline of what we were going to do. We are now incorporating these ideas into our existing program.


About this project

“This project is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of Action contre la Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.