CAWST in the News: CAWST Co-Founder David Manz to Receive Alberta’s Highest Honour

Dr. David Manz, inventor of the biosand filter and co-founder of CAWST, will become a member of the Alberta Order of Excellence this fall.

Dr. David Manz, CAWST co-founder and inventor of the biosand filter.
Dr. David Manz, CAWST co-founder and inventor of the biosand filter.

CALGARY, May 14, 2018 – Through the Alberta Order of Excellence, the Province of Alberta recognizes outstanding citizens, community leaders and innovators for their lifetime of remarkable contributions. This year, in acknowledgement of his outstanding international impact, Dr. David Manz, co-founder of CAWST and inventor of the biosand filter, will become a member of the Alberta Order of Excellence.

In October of 2018, Dr. David Manz, along with seven other Albertans -including k.d. lang and Canada’s first female pilot, Rosella Bjornson- will become members of the Alberta Order of Excellence. Members are inducted into the Order at a special ceremony at Government House in Edmonton. Dr. Manz will be among only 173 members of the Alberta Order of Excellence.

Read the announcement by the Government of Alberta here.

The biosand filter is a household water treatment technology. It was inspired by slow sand filtration, a water treatment process that has been used since the early 1800s. It depends on the same processes that naturally occur in sand at the banks of rivers. Dr. David Manz invented the biosand filter in the early 1990s at the University of Calgary. He co-founded CAWST in 2001 and made his invention freely available for humanitarian means.

CAWST is delighted to congratulate Dr. Manz, one of Canada’s leading humanitarians, on this well-deserved commendation, which is the highest honour a citizen can receive from the province of Alberta. Dr. Manz’s biosand filter invention, as well as his vision and generosity, have been integral to bringing safe, clean water to millions of people around the world.


Learn more about the biosand filter here, and find technical information about the biosand filter here and at manzwaterinfo.ca.

Banner image: CAWST. A little girl in Nepal drinks clean water from a biosand filter.

Public Engager

Are you a master of allure, conversation and engagement in International Development? We have an opening for a summer student position within the Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives department, to help deliver our public engagement activities and strategy over the summer.

Are you a master of allure, conversation and engagement in International Development? We have an opening for a summer student position within the Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives department, to help deliver our public engagement activities and strategy over the summer.

The Position: Public Engager

Type: Summer Student, 8 Weeks

Start Date: Mid-June 2018

 

Position Summary

The Public Engager is a summer student position within the Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives department and helps to deliver CAWST’s Public Engagement activities and strategy over the summer.

 

Responsibilities

  • Coordinate our participation at summer festivals, including logistics support (design, set up, take down) for summer festival booths, engage people in conversation and education activities on CAWST and global and local water issues, and developing educational activities for these booths
  • Support Wavemakers activities in the summer, including Ride the Rockies, a bike trip that tours the local watershed and fosters environmental stewardship over 5 days.
  • Develop information and communication materials, support our social media plan with fresh content
  • Edit and update Wavemakers resources on the website, ensuring everything is current
  • Deliver Wavemakers workshops at summer camps
  • Support development and execution of Donor communications material and other donor initiatives
  • Support administrative tasks of Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives as needed

 

Education

  • Currently working towards undergraduate degree

 

Experience

  • Experience engaging a wide range of age groups, from youth to seniors
  • Experience public speaking or engaging people in public settings
  • Experience coordinating events and/or program administration
  • Proficient in Windows-based computer programs (e.g. Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
  • Proficiency using social media as a tool for public engagement

 

Skills & Attributes / Qualifications

  • Passion for CAWST and our cause!
  • Excellent written and verbal English
  • Ability to communicate and connect with a wide variety of people and tailor messages for many audiences
  • Creative and entrepreneurial in developing new ways to engage public
  • Organized: Enjoys handling multiple tasks in a fast-paced environment with competing priorities
  • Team player: An accomplished professional who can work well both independently and within a team
  • Problem solver: Able to think creatively about challenges, resolve issues and seek support when necessary
  • Attention to detail: Able to manage all components down to the last detail
  • Analytical capability: Assess opportunities and make recommendations
  • Computer skills: Proficient in Microsoft Office and social media. Knowledge/use of graphic design tools (Photoshop, InDesign) considered an asset, but not necessary
  • Willing to work on weekends of summer festivals

 

Additional Requirements

This position is part of the Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) initiative of the Summer Work Experience program of the Government of Canada. CSJ provides funding to not-for-profit organizations, public-sector employers and small businesses with 50 or fewer full-time employees to create summer job opportunities for young people aged 15 to 30 years who are full-time students intending to return to their studies in the next school year.

  • A valid driver’s license and vehicle are required
  • Between 15 and 30 years of age (inclusive) at the start of employment
  • Was registered as a full-time student in the preceding academic year and intends to return to school on a full-time basis during the next academic year in a secondary, post-secondary, vocational or technical program
  • Is a Canadian Citizen, permanent resident or person on whom refugee protection has been conferred under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Is legally entitled to work in Canada
  • The successful candidate must provide a criminal record check before employment begins

 

To Apply

Please send your cover letter, resume, and attached questionnaire to cawstHR@cawst.org. No phone calls please. Only those candidates able to work in Canada will be reviewed; and only those granted an interview will be contacted.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 15.4 million people get better water or sanitation.

The Financial Post named CAWST one of the Top 23 Charities in Canada in 2017. Read the article.

Financial Analyst

Are you a Financial Analyst with a passion for applying your skills and experience to make the world a better place? We are looking for an exceptional individual to provide internal financial analysis services for all CAWST departments, ensuring accurate and up-to-date information on our finances, budgeting, and program funding.

The Position:             Financial Analyst

Reports to:                 Director, Business Services

Type:                               Full Time, Permanent

Position Start Date:  As soon as possible

Position Summary

As part of the Business Services team, this position provides internal financial analysis services for all CAWST departments, ensuring accurate and up-to-date information on our finances, budgeting, and program funding.

CAWST’s financial management and stewardship is integral to the overall management of the organization. It contributes directly to our ongoing sustainability as an organization. Our data is becoming more complex with respect to the diversity of funding, variety of projects, and increased global impact. Our reporting needs to be concise, precise, and timely.

This role will work closely with the Manager, Accounting to support the accounting function. The role will also be backup for the Manager, Accounting.

Responsibilities

  • Prepare monthly financials and stewardship reporting
  • Input donation data, reconcile to revenue, and prepare tax receipts for approval
  • Prepare meaningful analysis and reports to support management, staff, and the Board of Directors
  • Prepare short and long range financial forecasts for the organization and for program-related funding
  • Process monthly timesheets and revenue recognition of restricted funding
  • Drive financial analysis of program related expenditures
  • Coordinate the annual budgeting process
  • Support budgeting for funding and earned income proposals
  • Prepare invoices, as needed, and follow up on aged receivables
  • Prepare the finance-related Key Performance Indicators
  • Support the Manager, Accounting to ensure timely month-end financials and reporting
  • Complete annual T3010 filing
  • Assess CAWST’s liquidity and manage Guaranteed Investment Certificates
  • Identify areas for efficiencies and process improvements
  • Proactively communicate and collaborate with departments and program managers to analyze needs
  • Other duties as required

 

Education

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Business, Commerce, Accounting or Finance
  • Certified Professional Accounting designation (or working towards designation) is a strong asset

 

Experience

  • 3-5 years of experience in Financial Analysis and Accounting
  • Excellent working knowledge of advanced functions in Microsoft Excel, including VBA
  • Experience working with Dynamics NAV an asset
  • Experience working for a charity is an asset

 

To Apply

Please apply by sending your cover letter and resume to recruiting@aboutstaffing.com.


Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 15.4 million people get better water or sanitation.

The Financial Post newspaper named CAWST one of the Top 25 Charities in Canada in 2015. Read the article.

Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions, and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

Hygiene Research in DRC

Working in partnership, ACF, LSHTM, and CAWST are bringing together their experience and networks to develop deep understandings of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings so as to contribute to the development of rapid and effective intervention tools.

CAWST has been working with Action Contre Faim (ACF) and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to better understand handwashing practices among internally displaced people. Working together on this project, our partnership brings together our experience and networks in academic health research, humanitarian operational experience in WASH and Mental Health, and development of educational material. The general objective of the research is to develop deep understandings of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings, thus contributing to the development of rapid and effective intervention tools; the ultimate goal of the research will be to equip emergency responders with the knowledge and tools to intervene rapidly and effectively on hygiene behaviour. Phase 1 of this project explores the determinants of hygiene behaviour in these contexts. To fulfill the objectives of this phase, exploratory field work was carried out in Iraq and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Phase 2 will involve developing a software-based decision-making tool to aid in the design of rapid, evidence-based programs.
The full findings, including practitioner resources, will be available in 2018.

In her earlier blog post, Sian White, the project’s lead researcher, shared four research methods she has been using and what these had revealed so far in her exploratory fieldwork in Iraq. In this update, Sian discusses the work done in Iraq and DRC, including the research objectives and methods used and some of the key findings from the qualitative research.

Study sites: Iraq and DRC

 


Cholera has been endemic in DRC since 1994. In the eastern provinces of North and South Kivu, cases are registered throughout the year with peaks at the end of the dry season. However, in 2017 DRC experienced its worst cholera outbreak in decades with almost 50,000 suspected cases and over 900 deaths registered between January and December. Although the outbreak spread across 21 of the nation’s 26 provinces, the Kivus were the worst affected. Minova, where the research took place, sits alongside Lake Kivu, a renowned reservoir for vibro cholera. There are also two informal IDP camps in Minova and many other IDPs living in the community.

 

Qualitative research

Methods

The research was designed based on the Behaviour Centred Design framework (Aunger and Curtis, 2016). This framework outlines a set of behavioural determinants. For each of these a handwashing specific definition of the determinant was developed as an output of the literature review. By reviewing handwashing literature and looking more broadly a method was then selected to explore each determinant in the framework.

Key preliminary findings from the qualitative research – DRC

Handwashing behaviour

Observations indicated that handwashing with soap and hand rising (with water alone) were rare in these locations. Handwashing with soap was only observed once among the 17 observation households. Handwashing rarely took place after using the toilet but hand rinsing was sometimes practiced before eating, and this was actively taught to children as part of good mannerly behaviour. Hands rinsing was most often motivated by disgust, that is to say that hands were washed when they were visibly dirty (e.g. after returning from the field). Despite the low prevalence of handwashing behaviour people were well aware of the benefits of handwashing and 98% of participants could explain the association between handwashing and disease transmission.

One of the main factors that prevented convenient handwashing was the absence of handwashing facilities. None of the urban houses we visited had a dedicated place for handwashing. In camps facilities had been built several years ago but were now damaged and non-functional. In rural areas some houses had built tippy-taps (as part of a prior Community-led Total Sanitation campaign) but none were observed to be used or working. In focus groups people reported that they disliked the design of the tippy-taps and saw them as a symbol of poverty that they were not willing to adopt. Both water and soap were considered valuable and therefore people were often reluctant to store them near the toilets or kitchens which were often unclean, shared spaces. During behaviour trials participants identified that one of the barriers to handwashing was that there was nothing to cue behaviour at the key times and this prompted several people to design and build handwashing facilities. They were able to do so in a short period of time, using local materials and at no cost.

Handwashing is not considered to be a worthwhile use of soap. Partly this is because NGOs have promoted the use of ash as a free alternative for handwashing. Handwashing with ash was practiced by some people, but was described as unpleasant and undesirable, resulting in it being used infrequently. Where soap is available in households it is normally laundry powder or laundry bar soap. Although soap is rarely distributed by NGOs, in cases where it is, it is the laundry bar soap that is normally procured. However, participants explained that they would never use this for handwashing as it smells unpleasant and makes their hands dry. In camps and among host community members people live very communally. It is common for people to share containers and tools, share food and give water to a neighbour if they are running low. It was considered acceptable to ask a neighbour for soap to do laundry or for bathing but the idea of asking for soap for handwashing was considered humorous and people reported that you would be seen as trying to be above others if you did so.

In this setting it was common for daily household earnings to be less than $US 2. Daily routines were entirely oriented around earning enough to buy food for that day. With these limited resources adults would normally only eat once a day. People explained that their constant hunger constrained their capacity to remember to be hygienic (for example this was the main reason people said they often forget to wash hands prior to food preparation or eating). In order to earn sufficient money, adults spend most of their day in the fields, leaving young children at home unaccompanied. Parents acknowledged that they were worried about their children’s hygiene during these hours, but felt powerless to change this situation. This suggests that in this context the nurture motive may be less appropriate to utilise to promote handwashing. Although handwashing was a socially desirable behaviour, observed transgressions in handwashing practice were rarely socially sanctioned. This was largely because people normally adopted a forgiving attitude towards such transgressions, assuming that others, like them, must be dealing with poverty, hunger and psychological trauma (due to conflict and displacement). Affiliation (the desire to belong in a social group and therefore conform to group behaviours) did not emerge as a strong motivator of handwashing in this context. During the motives activity people explained that many of their close friends have poor hygiene but this just due to their circumstances rather than their character. In contrast people were judgmental of the handwashing behaviour of their spouse and explained that they could not be attracted to someone if they did not have clean hands. People did think that at a community-level handwashing increased in response to the cholera outbreak. People thought that for the majority of people this would only cause a short-term change in behaviour, but for others it could result in improved habits.

Attitudes and experiences of cholera

All participants were well informed about cholera and able to explain all key transmission routes. In focus group discussions people ranked cholera as the health issue that they were most concerned about and thought that it was the health issue which most commonly affected members of their community. In contrast diarrhoea was considered a mild health issue that did not have severe consequences and was only due to ‘disagreeable food’. Despite this reported ‘fear’ of cholera people simultaneously felt that cholera was just like any other disease and their familiarity with it over the years had allowed them to develop the belief that it could easily be treated (for free) and therefore rarely resulted in death. Consistent with this, many research participants told us that ‘black people don’t die of germs’. This saying was used to rationalise the fact that although most people viewed their environment as dirty and contaminated, and often lacked the means to be hygienic, it was rarely perceived to have adverse consequences. These factors have contributed to cholera no longer being seen as an outbreak disease but rather as a chronic health problem that the population had to manage and tolerate.

Although participants knew that good hygiene practices could reduce the likelihood of getting cholera most people who had contracted cholera felt that in their case it must have been due to bad luck, with the high prevalence of cases causing hygienic people like themselves to fall ill. Since most people knew someone who had had cholera recently there was minimal stigma towards the disease. People perceived it as normal for young children and older people to get cholera – in both cases people explained that this was because it is hard to control their behaviour. However, if healthy adults contracted cholera this was still met with confusion and stigma. Adult cholera cases reported that friends tended not to visit them when they heard they had got cholera. Immediate family and neighbours did not tend to ‘stay away’ nor change their opinion of the person with cholera. These individuals often played an important role in helping the cholera patient to recover. In addition to proximity, this may explain why intra-household transmission and transmission between neighbouring households was common in this region (and is well documented in the literature). Another contributing factor in this region is that cholera case management and follow-up remains suboptimal. On discharge patients are given 7 water treatment tablets and a small bar of laundry soap (although often they do not receive either). Providing such a small amount of hygiene provisions has the effect of distorting people’s risk perception, facilitating beliefs that it is not necessary to sustain good hygiene behaviours in the long term. This is of particular concern given that cholera cases may continue shedding for up to 50 days post discharge.

Although people had strong attitudes towards cholera as a disease, people on average had a poor understanding of the socio-economic impact that it could have on a household. Cholera cases described that they often felt weak and were unable to fulfil their normal tasks for up to a month after being discharged. In a context like DRC where people are generally living in extreme poverty and need to work in order to put food on the table each day, this has a substantial impact on the family economy. With less available of money, people said that they were normally unable to afford products like soap in the weeks after being discharged. Additionally, having a cholera case in the household often meant that the family could not collect as much water as normal (either because the women of the household were personally affected or because they were involved in caring for male household members who were sick). Both of these factors obviously place other family members at higher risk of contracting cholera.

Lastly people tended to associate cholera with people who they viewed to be categorically different from themselves. In focus group discussions people described a typical cholera cases as someone who is already sickly, has little respect for themselves or others, is arrogant and is poor and uneducated. Host community members thought cholera more commonly affected IDPs, while IDPs felt that they often had to behave more hygienically in order to rise above their circumstances and were therefore less likely to get cholera than the host community.

Implications for practitioners – DRC

• Knowledge: Almost everyone understood the association between handwashing and disease transmission. This means that we can stop educating people about disease transmission as part of programs.
• Behavioural settings: Creating dedicated places for handwashing would help to reposition handwashing as a norm and act as a cue or reminder to prompt behaviour. Prior programs that have attempted to do this have installed facilities that are not considered pleasant to use and which break easily. New initiatives should incentivise family units or compounds to design and build their own facilities that are appealing and affordable. Doing these initiatives at the compound level could work well in this context since neighbours are already reliant on each other for many aspects of their daily lives. This would enable families to pool their resources so that they are able to purchase soap for handwashing. A collective commitment to handwashing among the compound members might make handwashing more social judged and therefore adhered to. This may also enable soap and water to be kept at the handwashing facilities.
• Products: There is a need to change perceptions towards soap. This may require organisations to reduce the extent to which they promote handwashing with ash. It will also require hygiene promotion activities that highlight the non-health benefits of soap, such as how nice hands smell afterwards or how soft they feel. This should be done through experiential learning (e.g. people trying different soap products and seeing how they smell). There may also be opportunities to work with women’s groups to rebrand/decorate locally produced soaps to make them more appealing.
• Supporting cholera cases upon discharge: Stronger efforts should be made to map where cholera cases reside and to support patients upon discharge. This will be critical for reducing transmission within the household and among neighbouring households. Tailored hygiene promotion and hygiene kits should be provided to families with a cholera case and their neighbours. Ideally cholera cases should receive hygiene provisions (e.g soap) sufficient for the first three months after their discharge (the period when they are still able to transmit the disease). The provision of hygiene products for this period should be staged. With some given immediately and further provisions given once the family has built a handwashing facility, for example.
 Shifting community perceptions towards cholera: Cholera is understood as a disease but its increasing familiarity is breeding complacency. Rather than continuing to tell people about the health risks of cholera it may be more effective to humanise the disease and emphasise other types of impacts that people are currently unaware of – such as the impact of cholera on household economies and on a person’s social relationships. It is important that this be done in a manner which is not just fearmongering but rather helps people to see a now familiar disease in a new light. One way of doing it would be to film short videos with people who have had cholera and get them to describe their personal experiences. These could then be taken house to house when doing hygiene promotion and shown on tablets/mobile devices.
• Motives: Disgust is currently the primary motivator of handwashing but could still be heightened by implementing activities like Glow Germs (www.glogerm.com). Motives that have been previously used to promote handwashing behaviour such as nurture and affiliation are likely to be less effective in this context than the motives of comfort and attract. One way that this could be done is by creating a picture or video-based narrative that links handwashing with romance and beauty or positions it as a way of feeling momentarily more comfortable despite difficult circumstances.
• Keeping a broad view: People in this context are under a lot of psychological and economic strain. Those delivering hygiene programs need to be mindful of the much bigger issues that people are facing and ideally connect people with other development initiatives which try to address these issues.

 

 


About this project

“This project is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of Action Contre La Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

Wavemakers Booth Crew at Mayors Environment Expo (Multiple Shifts Available)

Are you friendly, engaging and passionate about CAWST, water and science? CAWST is looking for individuals interested in setting up, hosting, and taking down our Wavemakers booth at the Mayor’s Expo!

The Position: Wavemakers Booth Crew at Science Fair

 Purpose of the Role:

To help set up, host, and take down our Wavemakers Booths at the Mayor’s Environment Expo with CAWST Wavemakers! You will engage youth, adults and educators in a brief build-your-own filter activity and share information on CAWST with those visiting the booth.

  • Tuesday June 5, 9 am – 3 pm (grades K-3)
  • Wednesday June 6, 9 am – 3 pm (grades 3-6)
  • Thursday June 7, 9 am – 3 pm (grades 7-9)

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Share knowledge on CAWST and CAWST Wavemakers
  • Deliver a quick and engaging activity (we will brief you on the activity when you arrive at the booth)
  • Respond to questions on CAWST
  • Support set up and take down of the booth (depending on shifts)
  • Inspire youth to take action on water issues! Over 1000 youth attend these science fairs
  • Track and log volunteer hours with the CAWST volunteer coordinator

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Familiar with CAWST
  • Friendly personality and keen to work with young people
  • Passion to help CAWST spread the word about water & sanitation
  • Organized and reliable
  • Willingness to lift heavy items (for set up and take down)

Department and Supervision: Wavemakers


Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you wish to apply for this volunteer position, please contact the Wavemakers Program Manager, Stephanie Southgate at ssouthgate@cawst.org.

If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form.

 

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. Volunteers are also invited to join in our annual Volunteer Appreciation night. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers.

Latin American WASH Sector gathers in Colombia to share knowledge, learn and advance the agenda of safe water in the region

The WHO/UNICEF International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS) is hosting the first Latin America Regional Workshop: “Advancing the Water Safety Agenda” in Bogota, Colombia, May 7-9, 2018.

Photo: CAWST

HWTS Network Latin America Regional Workshop in Bogota, Colombia

 

CALGARY, April 27, 2018 — CAWST is delighted to announce its participation in the first Latin America Regional Workshop: “Advancing the Water Safety Agenda” in Bogota, Colombia, May 7th to 9th, 2018. This trailblazing event will be hosted by the WHO/UNICEF International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS).

The Government of Colombia, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) / World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF, with the support of CAWST and other members of the network, will lead a participatory 3-day workshop to engage inter-sectoral stakeholders and unify efforts to make progress toward Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6.1, focusing on improved service delivery to achieve water safety from catchment to point-of-use.

In Latin America, access to improved water sources is high, but ensuring water safety remains a challenge, especially in remote, rural areas and areas of peri-urban growth. To address the challenge of safe water provision in such areas, the government of Colombia established several regulations in 2016 acknowledging alternative solutions for settings when centrally treated, piped water is not feasible. These regulations authorize municipalities and service providers to use a combination of service delivery approaches, including HWTS, to address water safety and reach unserved populations. As such, The WHO/UNICEF International Network on HWTS is hosting a Latin America Regional Workshop to learn from Colombia’s experience, share with and learn from other partners, and jointly advance the water safety agenda in the region.

General statistics show high levels of water coverage in many areas across Latin America”, explains Eva Manzano, Global WASH Advisor at CAWST, who will be facilitating this workshop. “However, in many cases, water quality is still a key challenge. Household water treatment and safe storage can play a key role in addressing this gap. Treating water in the home protects people from waterborne disease immediately, is affordable to reach the large number of people currently unserved, improves households’ resilience, and paves the way for better health, hygiene, and sanitation.

Interested in collaborating? Join us!

This event targets government representatives from the region, and network members are also welcome to participate. The event will be held in Spanish. If you are interested in attending and able to cover your own expenses to do so, please contact Eva Manzano (Global WASH Advisor, CAWST) at emanzano@cawst.org by May 1st. You can find event details at hwts.info/tandas.

Learn more

· How Colombia is innovating for safe water access and basic sanitation in dispersed populations, through its new legislation.

· The personal impact of capacity development in a rural community in Colombia.

· The business case for capacity development.

· Sustainable Development Goal 6.

· “2.1 billion people lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 4.5 billion people lack access to safely managed sanitation”. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2017.


Media Inquiries

Eva Manzano, BEng, MA
Global WASH Advisor
CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology)
  emanzano@cawst.org
  (Canadá): 1.403.243.3285 ext. 244
  (España): 34.717.701637


About CAWST

CAWST is a centre of expertise focused on providing training, consulting and educational resources on non-centralized water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions. CAWST tackles the global need for safe water and sanitation building knowledge and skills at the local level. As an expert in Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS), CAWST has extensive and in-depth knowledge of technologies, approaches, program implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

Find the CAWST logo here.

 

 

 

 

Primer taller regional reúne al sector hídrico en Colombia para avanzar la agenda del agua segura en Latinoamérica

La Red Internacional de la OMS/UNICEF sobre Tratamiento de Agua a Nivel Domiciliario y su Almacenamiento Seguro (TANDAS) organiza el primer Taller Regional en Latinoamérica: “Avanzando hacia la agenda de seguridad del agua” en Bogotá, Colombia, del 7 al 9 de mayo, 2018.

Photo: CAWST

Red Internacional de la OMS/UNICEF sobre Tratamiento de Agua a Nivel Domiciliario y su Almacenamiento Seguro (TANDAS)
Primer Taller Regional en Latinoamérica

CALGARY, 27 de abril de 2018 – CAWST se complace en anunciar su participación en el primer Taller Regional de América Latina: “Avanzando hacia la agenda de seguridad del agua” en Bogotá, Colombia, del 7 al 9 de mayo de 2018. Este evento será organizado por la Red Internacional de la OMS/UNICEF sobre Tratamiento de Agua a Nivel Domiciliario y su Almacenamiento Seguro (TANDAS).

El Gobierno de Colombia, la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS) / Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) y UNICEF, con el apoyo de CAWST y otros miembros de la red, conducirán un taller participativo de 3 días para involucrar a las partes interesadas intersectoriales y unificar los esfuerzos para avanzar hacia el Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) 6.1, centrándose en una mejor prestación de servicios para lograr la seguridad del agua desde la captación hasta el punto de uso.

En Latinoamérica, el acceso a fuentes de agua es alto, pero asegurar la calidad del agua sigue siendo un desafío, especialmente en zonas rurales, rurales dispersas y periurbanas en crecimiento. Para enfrentar el reto de la provisión de agua segura en estas áreas, el gobierno de Colombia estableció nueva legislación que reconoce la posibilidad de ampliar el acceso a agua con calidad, utilizando soluciones alternativas cuando no se cuenta con sistemas de tratamiento o de agua entubada, para contextos rurales o periurbanos. Estas reglamentaciones permiten a los municipios y proveedores de soluciones alternativas, implementar una combinación de enfoques internacionales, incluyendo el TANDAS, para orientar a individuos, familias y comunidades en el tema de agua segura. Como tal, la Red Internacional de la OMS/UNICEF sobre TANDAS está organizando un Taller Regional en Latinoamérica para aprender de la experiencia de Colombia, conocer y compartir experiencias y, de manera conjunta, avanzar la agenda del agua segura en la región.

En muchas zonas de América Latina, las estadísticas generales muestran altos niveles de cobertura de agua”, explica Eva Manzano, asesora global de WASH en CAWST, quien facilitará este taller. “Sin embargo, en muchos casos, la calidad del agua sigue siendo un desafío clave. El tratamiento del agua en el hogar y su almacenamiento seguro pueden desempeñar un papel clave para abordar esta brecha. El tratamiento del agua en el hogar protege a las personas de enfermedades transmitidas por el agua de manera inmediata, es asequible para llegar a la gran cantidad de personas actualmente sin servicio, mejora la resiliencia de los hogares y allana el camino para una mejor salud, higiene y saneamiento.

¿Interesado en colaborar? ¡Únase a nosotros!

Este evento está dirigido a representantes gubernamentales de la región, y los miembros de la red también son bienvenidos. El evento se llevará a cabo en español. Si está interesado en asistir y puede cubrir sus propios gastos para hacerlo, por favor comuníquese con la Ing. Eva Manzano (Asesora Global de WASH, CAWST) por correo electrónico a emanzano@cawst.org antes del 1 de mayo. Puede encontrar los detalles del evento en hwts.info/tandas.

 

Mayor información

· Colombia introduce nueva legislación para mejorar el acceso a agua segura en poblaciones dispersas.

· El impacto personal del desarrollo de capacidades en una comunidad rural de Colombia.

· The business case for capacity development.

· El Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) 6.

· “3 de cada 10 personas, o 2100 millones de personas, carecen de acceso a agua potable y disponible en el hogar, y 6 de cada 10, o 4500 millones, carecen de un saneamiento seguro.” Programa de Monitoreo Conjunto (JMP) de la OMS y UNICEF, 2017.


Contacto

Ing. Eva Manzano
Asesora Global de WASH
CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology)
  emanzano@cawst.org
  (Canadá): 1.403.243.3285 ext. 244
  (España): 34.717.701637


Acerca de CAWST

CAWST es un centro de experticia centrado en proveer capacitación, consultoría y materiales educativos sobre soluciones de agua y saneamiento no-centralizadas. CAWST aborda la necesidad global de agua segura y saneamiento construyendo conocimiento y habilidades a nivel local. Como experto en TANDAS, CAWST tiene un conocimiento extenso y profundo sobre tecnologías, enfoques, implementación de proyectos, monitoreo y evaluación.

Puede encontrar el logotipo de CAWST aquí.

 

 

Hygiene Research in Iraq

Working in partnership, ACF, LSHTM, and CAWST are bringing together their experience and networks to develop deep understandings of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings so as to contribute to the development of rapid and effective intervention tools.

CAWST has been working with Action Contre Faim (ACF) and The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to better understand handwashing practices among internally displaced people. Working together on this project, our partnership brings together our experience and networks in academic health research, humanitarian operational experience in WASH and Mental Health, and development of educational material. The general objective of the research is to develop deep understandings of the determinants of hand hygiene in emergency settings, thus contributing to the development of rapid and effective intervention tools; the ultimate goal of the research will be to equip emergency responders with the knowledge and tools to intervene rapidly and effectively on hygiene behaviour. Phase 1 of this project explores the determinants of hygiene behaviour in these contexts. To fulfill the objectives of this phase, exploratory field work was carried out in Iraq and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Phase 2 will involve developing a software-based decision-making tool to aid in the design of rapid, evidence-based programs.
The full findings, including practitioner resources, will be available in 2018.

In her earlier blog post, Sian White, the project’s lead researcher, shared four research methods she has been using and what these had revealed so far in her exploratory fieldwork in Iraq. In this update, Sian discusses the work done in Iraq and DRC, including the research objectives and methods used and some of the key findings from the qualitative research.

Study sites: Iraq and DRC


Since 2014, four million Iraqis are estimated to have been displaced due to conflict. The study sites for this research were the Dohuk and Ninewa Governorates (boundaries between these areas were disputed at the time as shown on the map opposite). The research took place during the final period of the battle for Mosul. The interviews with humanitarian actors took place in Erbil and Dohuk cities as these are the primary locations where organisations and coordinating bodies were based at the time.

 


Cholera has been endemic in DRC since 1994. In the eastern provinces of North and South Kivu, cases are registered throughout the year with peaks at the end of the dry season. However, in 2017 DRC experienced its worst cholera outbreak in decades with almost 50,000 suspected cases and over 900 deaths registered between January and December. Although the outbreak spread across 21 of the nation’s 26 provinces, the Kivus were the worst affected. Minova, where the research took place, sits alongside Lake Kivu, a renowned reservoir for vibro cholera. There are also two informal IDP camps in Minova and many other IDPs living in the community.

Objectives of the work in Iraq and DRC

1. Describe the determinants of handwashing behaviour:
• during and after mass displacement due to an armed conflict (Iraq).
• during a cholera outbreak in a context which also experiences ongoing conflict and population displacement (DRC).
2. Understand how humanitarian actors currently design hygiene programs and identify the constraints within which they have to operate.
3. Pilot and refine a set of rapid and simple formative research methods that could be replicated by humanitarian practitioners with limited experience and guidance.

 

Qualitative research

Methods

The research was designed based on the Behaviour Centred Design framework (Aunger and Curtis, 2016). This framework outlines a set of behavioural determinants. For each of these a handwashing specific definition of the determinant was developed as an output of the literature review. By reviewing handwashing literature and looking more broadly a method was then selected to explore each determinant in the framework.

Method Reflections – Iraq

Most of the methods were well accepted and were found to be appropriate to this context. Two methods were not used from the outset. The first was observation at communal waterpoints as these did not exist in these settings. The second was the behaviour trails method. This deemed in appropriate in the first camp in particular as people could not control their environments or circumstances and this is a highly participatory method that requires participants to actively make changes that would enable handwashing. The other method that was used with a small number of participants but then stopped was the social network mapping. This was a highly sensitive method as it reminded people of friendships and family they had lost/been separated from and the researchers felt that it had the potential to cause discomfort. Some of the methods that worked particularly well were observation, the 100 people activity, soap attribute ranking, the ideal handwashing facility activity and the personal histories activity. The latter was created for this research but proved useful for understanding the broader context as well as how hygiene practices changed over time.

Method reflections – DRC

Most of the methods were well accepted and were found to be appropriate to this context. Some of the methods that worked particularly well were the behaviour trials, the soap attribute ranking, the motive characters, the water prioritisation and the personal histories method. Observation was particularly challenging in this context because shelters were very small and dark, thus making it hard for the research assistants to position themselves in a discrete location. The lead researcher also had to cease participating in the observation (leaving it to the local staff) as the presence of a foreigner in the community tended to cause a lot of disruption and cause crowds to gather. Some of the methods took longer to do in this context because lower levels of literacy necessitating longer explanations.

 

Key preliminary findings from the qualitative research – Iraq

The situation in the short-term camp

Contrary to the research hypothesis, handwashing appeared to increase among those displaced to camps. This was due to a confluence of factors. The first factor was that in both camps there was no restriction on water use, which is relatively unusual compared to other camps globally. Secondly, we conducted the study at the height of summer when the temperatures are extremely hot and the environment very dusty, thus people got sweaty and unclean quickly. Thirdly people had relatively few possessions and as such  clothes, dishes and household spaces needed to be cleaned regularly. Fourthly, people reported a heightened sense of disease risk since coming to the camp and diarrhoea was cited as a leading concern. Lastly, there was very little for people to do in the camps. People tended to avoid socializing (particularly in the immediate period following displacement) and endeavoured to re-establish their routines and create more comfortable and orderly spaces within their households (often re-designing their shelters to make them more like home). In the absence of other tasks, cleaning behaviours became a predominant part of daily life. These circumstances created an environment where people frequently came into contact with water and where hygiene was highly valued. However, these circumstances may have created a false sense of cleanliness. Hands were often not washed with soap nor was handwashing practiced at all critical times. In particular we did not observe handwashing prior to food preparation or eating. In the short-term camp where WASH facilities were shared, handwashing with soap was less common as soap was normally stored inside people’s tents rather than near the bathroom (this was because people worried about it being stolen or used carelessly).

The situation in the long-term camp

Perceived risk is normally understood to diminish with time as people become accustomed to their new situation.  Surprisingly this was not found to be the case in the long-term displacement camp, with people still feeling at increased risk of diarrhoea. The circumstances described above (availability of water, the heat, the lack of belongings, and lots of time) were present in this camp too and this appears to have led to the creation of a new hygiene norm. In addition, several years of hygiene kit distributions have created a demand for soap even though hygiene products are no longer distributed. People reported spending a large portion of their income on hygiene products, it was stockpiled, available in all homes, and used excessively in day-to-day activities. In this setting the perceived quality of the water (it was of drinkable quality but had lots of minerals) was a barrier to regular handwashing as people felt it left a salty residue and led to their hands being dry and irritated.

The situation in the villages

In the villages hygiene behaviour was different from camps and varied depending on whether individuals were returnees or were IDPs. For returnees being back home was accompanied with feeling safe and protected. As a consequence, people were more likely to think that diarrhoea was not a risk to their families, that it was uncommon in their villages and not something to be scared of. However, people were returning to homes and communities that were different to those they left. For example, buildings had been destroyed and possessions looted; the water supply had been cut and so people had shifted from piped water to collecting a limited amount of water in jerry cans; people were unemployed; and markets (including those that sold soap) had ceased operation. Handwashing was uncommon in these settings and many families did not have soap in their households. Despite this there was a desire among returnees to ‘build back more beautiful’ and to maintain their own appearance despite their circumstances. In communities, people tended to have dedicated places for handwashing. In most cases these were beautifully appointed ceramic basins, with piped water, a soap dish and a mirror. The basins were prominently located near the front of the house for guests to use. However almost all basins were damaged or non-functional due to the lack of water supply, making it harder and less appealing to wash hands. IDPs residing among returnee communities explained that hygiene was of utmost importance to their identity. They felt that being an IDP meant others were likely to label them as unclean and poor. They explained that they had made paid attention to the hygiene norms of others in the community and had actively taught their children that they must be more hygienic than the community members so as to create the right impression.

Implications for Practitioners

• Knowledge: Almost everyone understood the association between handwashing and disease transmission. This means that we can stop educating people about disease transmission as part of programs.
• Behavioural settings: In this context people are used to beautiful facilities for handwashing. Camps and rebuilding efforts in villages, should aim to re-create and enhance this. This should involve creating dedicated spaces for handwashing that are pleasant places to be. Facilities should include ‘behavioural nudges’, mirrors and soap dishes. They should be built outside the toilet where it can be seen but where it is still convenient.
• Products: Support the re-establishment of markets so that people in villages can access soap more readily. In camps increase the range of soaps available and allow people to choose the soap they prefer as this will make the product more desirable.
• Norms: In camp settings it is clear that positive handwashing norms exist but that people don’t often observe the behaviour of others. Programs should aim to heighten awareness about positive norms. A simple way of doing this, for example, may be to put up posters that say “Did you know this camp has the highest rates of handwashing of any camp in Kurdistan – Keep it up!”.
• Motives: disgust appears to be naturally heightened in camp settings so improving handwashing in these contexts should rely on linking comfort and attract more closely to handwashing, motives which become increasingly of value when a person has lost so much. To overcome the hygiene complacency observed in villages, disgust should be heightened in order to make people more aware that their home has changed and therefore their behaviour needs to change too.
• Social environment: People do not naturally socialise very much upon arriving at camps, nor do they always receive the necessary psychological support that they require following trauma. Since this research found psychosocial wellbeing to be closely linked to hygiene, hygiene programs could contribute to re-building social support networks and creating spaces where people can talk and interact. Cross-sectional programming between mental health and the WASH sector should be encouraged.
• Delivery channels: Since women are often responsible for key hygiene related tasks but often do not leave the house, all hygiene programs should involve at least some house-to-house component to ensure women feel comfortable and can participate.

Barrier Analysis – Iraq

The qualitative work was complemented with a Barrier Analysis (BA) Survey. Some general reflections on this method:
• This method works very well to complement qualitative research and was also able to confirm some of the qualitative insights (eg. Risk perception).
• This method was good at understanding rational reasons why people do or don’t do the target behaviour but less able to explore behavioural influences that occur at a semi-subconscious level. This is another reason to combine this method with qualitative approaches.
•  Screening is based on self-reported and proxy measures of behaviour NOT actual behaviour. In a camp setting people are familiar with hygiene promotion and know the ‘correct’ thing to say.
• The classifications of ‘Doer’ and ‘Non-doer’ are useful because they help to make behaviour simple. But as practitioners we have to remember that these classifications are not reflective of the real-world situation. In reality we all sometimes remember to wash hands and sometimes forget and thus the lines between the categories are more blurry.

Key preliminary findings from the qualitative research – DRC

Handwashing behaviour

Observations indicated that handwashing with soap and hand rising (with water alone) were rare in these locations. Handwashing with soap was only observed once among the 17 observation households. Handwashing rarely took place after using the toilet but hand rinsing was sometimes practiced before eating, and this was actively taught to children as part of good mannerly behaviour. Hands rinsing was most often motivated by disgust, that is to say that hands were washed when they were visibly dirty (e.g. after returning from the field). Despite the low prevalence of handwashing behaviour people were well aware of the benefits of handwashing and 98% of participants could explain the association between handwashing and disease transmission.

One of the main factors that prevented convenient handwashing was the absence of handwashing facilities. None of the urban houses we visited had a dedicated place for handwashing. In camps facilities had been built several years ago but were now damaged and non-functional. In rural areas some houses had built tippy-taps (as part of a prior Community-led Total Sanitation campaign) but none were observed to be used or working. In focus groups people reported that they disliked the design of the tippy-taps and saw them as a symbol of poverty that they were not willing to adopt. Both water and soap were considered valuable and therefore people were often reluctant to store them near the toilets or kitchens which were often unclean, shared spaces. During behaviour trials participants identified that one of the barriers to handwashing was that there was nothing to cue behaviour at the key times and this prompted several people to design and build handwashing facilities. They were able to do so in a short period of time, using local materials and at no cost.

Handwashing is not considered to be a worthwhile use of soap. Partly this is because NGOs have promoted the use of ash as a free alternative for handwashing. Handwashing with ash was practiced by some people, but was described as unpleasant and undesirable, resulting in it being used infrequently. Where soap is available in households it is normally laundry powder or laundry bar soap. Although soap is rarely distributed by NGOs, in cases where it is, it is the laundry bar soap that is normally procured. However, participants explained that they would never use this for handwashing as it smells unpleasant and makes their hands dry. In camps and among host community members people live very communally. It is common for people to share containers and tools, share food and give water to a neighbour if they are running low. It was considered acceptable to ask a neighbour for soap to do laundry or for bathing but the idea of asking for soap for handwashing was considered humorous and people reported that you would be seen as trying to be above others if you did so.

In this setting it was common for daily household earnings to be less than $US 2. Daily routines were entirely oriented around earning enough to buy food for that day. With these limited resources adults would normally only eat once a day. People explained that their constant hunger constrained their capacity to remember to be hygienic (for example this was the main reason people said they often forget to wash hands prior to food preparation or eating). In order to earn sufficient money, adults spend most of their day in the fields, leaving young children at home unaccompanied. Parents acknowledged that they were worried about their children’s hygiene during these hours, but felt powerless to change this situation. This suggests that in this context the nurture motive may be less appropriate to utilise to promote handwashing. Although handwashing was a socially desirable behaviour, observed transgressions in handwashing practice were rarely socially sanctioned. This was largely because people normally adopted a forgiving attitude towards such transgressions, assuming that others, like them, must be dealing with poverty, hunger and psychological trauma (due to conflict and displacement). Affiliation (the desire to belong in a social group and therefore conform to group behaviours) did not emerge as a strong motivator of handwashing in this context. During the motives activity people explained that many of their close friends have poor hygiene but this just due to their circumstances rather than their character. In contrast people were judgmental of the handwashing behaviour of their spouse and explained that they could not be attracted to someone if they did not have clean hands. People did think that at a community-level handwashing increased in response to the cholera outbreak. People thought that for the majority of people this would only cause a short-term change in behaviour, but for others it could result in improved habits.

Attitudes and experiences of cholera

All participants were well informed about cholera and able to explain all key transmission routes. In focus group discussions people ranked cholera as the health issue that they were most concerned about and thought that it was the health issue which most commonly affected members of their community. In contrast diarrhoea was considered a mild health issue that did not have severe consequences and was only due to ‘disagreeable food’. Despite this reported ‘fear’ of cholera people simultaneously felt that cholera was just like any other disease and their familiarity with it over the years had allowed them to develop the belief that it could easily be treated (for free) and therefore rarely resulted in death. Consistent with this, many research participants told us that ‘black people don’t die of germs’. This saying was used to rationalise the fact that although most people viewed their environment as dirty and contaminated, and often lacked the means to be hygienic, it was rarely perceived to have adverse consequences. These factors have contributed to cholera no longer being seen as an outbreak disease but rather as a chronic health problem that the population had to manage and tolerate.

Although participants knew that good hygiene practices could reduce the likelihood of getting cholera most people who had contracted cholera felt that in their case it must have been due to bad luck, with the high prevalence of cases causing hygienic people like themselves to fall ill. Since most people knew someone who had had cholera recently there was minimal stigma towards the disease. People perceived it as normal for young children and older people to get cholera – in both cases people explained that this was because it is hard to control their behaviour. However, if healthy adults contracted cholera this was still met with confusion and stigma. Adult cholera cases reported that friends tended not to visit them when they heard they had got cholera. Immediate family and neighbours did not tend to ‘stay away’ nor change their opinion of the person with cholera. These individuals often played an important role in helping the cholera patient to recover. In addition to proximity, this may explain why intra-household transmission and transmission between neighbouring households was common in this region (and is well documented in the literature). Another contributing factor in this region is that cholera case management and follow-up remains suboptimal. On discharge patients are given 7 water treatment tablets and a small bar of laundry soap (although often they do not receive either). Providing such a small amount of hygiene provisions has the effect of distorting people’s risk perception, facilitating beliefs that it is not necessary to sustain good hygiene behaviours in the long term. This is of particular concern given that cholera cases may continue shedding for up to 50 days post discharge.

Although people had strong attitudes towards cholera as a disease, people on average had a poor understanding of the socio-economic impact that it could have on a household. Cholera cases described that they often felt weak and were unable to fulfil their normal tasks for up to a month after being discharged. In a context like DRC where people are generally living in extreme poverty and need to work in order to put food on the table each day, this has a substantial impact on the family economy. With less available of money, people said that they were normally unable to afford products like soap in the weeks after being discharged. Additionally, having a cholera case in the household often meant that the family could not collect as much water as normal (either because the women of the household were personally affected or because they were involved in caring for male household members who were sick). Both of these factors obviously place other family members at higher risk of contracting cholera.

Lastly people tended to associate cholera with people who they viewed to be categorically different from themselves. In focus group discussions people described a typical cholera cases as someone who is already sickly, has little respect for themselves or others, is arrogant and is poor and uneducated. Host community members thought cholera more commonly affected IDPs, while IDPs felt that they often had to behave more hygienically in order to rise above their circumstances and were therefore less likely to get cholera than the host community.

Implications for practitioners – DRC

• Knowledge: Almost everyone understood the association between handwashing and disease transmission. This means that we can stop educating people about disease transmission as part of programs.
• Behavioural settings: Creating dedicated places for handwashing would help to reposition handwashing as a norm and act as a cue or reminder to prompt behaviour. Prior programs that have attempted to do this have installed facilities that are not considered pleasant to use and which break easily. New initiatives should incentivise family units or compounds to design and build their own facilities that are appealing and affordable. Doing these initiatives at the compound level could work well in this context since neighbours are already reliant on each other for many aspects of their daily lives. This would enable families to pool their resources so that they are able to purchase soap for handwashing. A collective commitment to handwashing among the compound members might make handwashing more social judged and therefore adhered to. This may also enable soap and water to be kept at the handwashing facilities.
• Products: There is a need to change perceptions towards soap. This may require organisations to reduce the extent to which they promote handwashing with ash. It will also require hygiene promotion activities that highlight the non-health benefits of soap, such as how nice hands smell afterwards or how soft they feel. This should be done through experiential learning (e.g. people trying different soap products and seeing how they smell). There may also be opportunities to work with women’s groups to rebrand/decorate locally produced soaps to make them more appealing.
• Supporting cholera cases upon discharge: Stronger efforts should be made to map where cholera cases reside and to support patients upon discharge. This will be critical for reducing transmission within the household and among neighbouring households. Tailored hygiene promotion and hygiene kits should be provided to families with a cholera case and their neighbours. Ideally cholera cases should receive hygiene provisions (e.g soap) sufficient for the first three months after their discharge (the period when they are still able to transmit the disease). The provision of hygiene products for this period should be staged. With some given immediately and further provisions given once the family has built a handwashing facility, for example.
 Shifting community perceptions towards cholera: Cholera is understood as a disease but its increasing familiarity is breeding complacency. Rather than continuing to tell people about the health risks of cholera it may be more effective to humanise the disease and emphasise other types of impacts that people are currently unaware of – such as the impact of cholera on household economies and on a person’s social relationships. It is important that this be done in a manner which is not just fearmongering but rather helps people to see a now familiar disease in a new light. One way of doing it would be to film short videos with people who have had cholera and get them to describe their personal experiences. These could then be taken house to house when doing hygiene promotion and shown on tablets/mobile devices.
• Motives: Disgust is currently the primary motivator of handwashing but could still be heightened by implementing activities like Glow Germs (www.glogerm.com). Motives that have been previously used to promote handwashing behaviour such as nurture and affiliation are likely to be less effective in this context than the motives of comfort and attract. One way that this could be done is by creating a picture or video-based narrative that links handwashing with romance and beauty or positions it as a way of feeling momentarily more comfortable despite difficult circumstances.
• Keeping a broad view: People in this context are under a lot of psychological and economic strain. Those delivering hygiene programs need to be mindful of the much bigger issues that people are facing and ideally connect people with other development initiatives which try to address these issues.

Barrier Analysis – DRC

The qualitative work was complemented with a Barrier Analysis (BA) Survey. Some general reflections on this method – DRC:
• This method works very well when complemented with qualitative research. It was able to confirm some of the qualitative insights (eg. hunger and stress making people less able to practice handwashing). The insights from the Barrier Analysis can be interpreted more soundly by setting them against the broader qualitative dataset.
• When doing the Barrier Analysis in this setting we had tried to sample every fifth house (although random selection is not a requirement of BA) which has a child under the age of 5.
• Although this was done in order to get a diverse sample and create a fair way of selecting participants from among a broader population, it was actually perceived as unfair by many people in the camps and communities. In humanitarian response it is common for everyone to receive interventions equally so those houses that did not participate perceived that they may be missing out on something (even if this was not the case).
• To be done effectively Barrier Analysis requires close supervision and diligent data collectors. Staff need to treat every interview with equal care and precision. The repetitiveness of the process can easily lead to data collectors cutting corners by rushing through the interview without sufficient probing or reflection or changing the way questions are asked.
• In DRC and in the previous survey we conducted in Iraq our translators struggled to come up with a local term for ‘approve’ and ‘disapprove’ as it is used in the social norms questions. The terms chosen ended up being more serious in nature and more about bearing witness to the behaviour.
• Often Barrier Analyses generate results that are inconsistent (e.g. responses to different questions contradict each other directly) or that don’t really make sense behaviourally (e.g. we would expect that non-doers were more aware of cultural taboos discouraging handwashing and less aware of community rules that encourage hygiene). The tendency is to disregard such results but this surely calls into question the validity of the other results.
• The Barrier Analysis covers a lot of determinants in a short period of time through quite focused questions. However, such a format may not provide an appropriate setting for participants to actually answer the questions being asked. For example, if a stranger (the data collector) asks a set of rapid questions and then asks about cultural taboos, participants may be likely give a socially desirable response since answering honestly may not align with the format.
• The analysis process for BA surveys is highly subjective but this is rarely acknowledged within the method. As with any analysis of qualitative data, the number of categories and types of categories created will shape the results of the data substantially.

Dissemination Meetings

Iraq

At the end of the field visit the research team held a dissemination meeting to share the results with key humanitarian actors and the government. The meeting was attended by 71 participants from 31 different NGOs or government departments. The meeting consisted of an introduction to behaviour change and behavioural determinants; a ‘methods marketplace’ where people had the change to wander around the room and interact with posters, tools and photos from each method; a presentation on the qualitative results, a presentation on the Barrier Analysis results; and closing remarks from the Deputy Governor of Dohuk. At the beginning of the session participants were asked to write down on a piece of paper the main reasons people in camps in communities do not always wash their hands and suggest a solution. The most common problems cited were a lack of soap, water and appropriate WASH facilities; a lack of bio-medical knowledge; a belief that handwashing was not a part of their prior culture or habits; and that as part of the psychological impact of displacement, people show signs of depression that translates into them being too bored, forgetful, and lazy to wash their hands.  The predominant solutions related to increased education about handwashing and the provision of hygiene kits.

DRC

Key stakeholders were invited to dissemination meetings in Goma and in Kinshasa in March/April 2018. The Goma dissemination workshop was attended by 45 people from 26 different international NGOs, local NGOs, government agencies and UN agencies.  The entire workshop was presented by the three Research Assistants Anna Mutula Christine, François Kawalina Mazimwe and Modeste Munganga Buroko. The workshop in Kinshasa was attended by 43 people from 26 different International NGOs, local NGOs, UN agencies, government agencies and donor agencies. It followed the same format as the one in Goma and was also lead by the three Research Assistants.

 


About this project

“This project is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of Action Contre La Faim (ACF), The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and CAWST (Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

Wavemakers Social Media Content Supporter

Are you a social media enthusiast who is interested in youth, education and the environment? Share your creativity and support the Wavemakers program by researching, developing and sharing content that is relevant to our audiences.

The Position: Wavemakers Social Media Content Supporter 

Purpose of the Role:

Help to research, curate and plan content for Wavemakers social media (Instagram, Twitter & Facebook) on key topic areas.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Research and share content
  • Prepare posts for social media
  • Attend monthly or bi-monthly social media planning meeting with staff to prepare content

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Familiar with CAWST, especially youth Wavemakers
  • Experience with social media, especially creating content
  • Passionate about topic areas like environmental education, water, community development, youth leadership, STEM learning

 

Estimated time commitment: 1 hour per week

Department and Supervision: Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives


Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, please contact the Volunteer Program Coordinator, Tori D’Avella, at volunteers@cawst.org or 403-243-3285 ext 259 to express your interest in this position.

If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form.

 

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers.

CAWST Booth Host

Are you keen to share knowledge about water and sanitation with the public? We have opportunities to host booths at upcoming Green Calgary events, and we need your help!

The Position: CAWST Booth Host

Purpose of the Role:

Be the primary host of a casual CAWST information booth at any of the following Green Calgary Events. Engage people and help them learn one thing they didn’t know before about water and sanitation. Events include:

  • April 14 at 8:30 am – noon; ATB Walden, 300 – 151 Walden Gate SE
  • April 21 at 8:30 am – noon; IKEA, 8000 11 St SE
  • April 28 at 8:30 am – noon; Community Natural Foods, 202 61 Ave SW
  • May 5 at 8:30 am – noon; ATB Saddleridge, 50 Saddletowne Cir NE
  • May 12 at 8:30 am – noon; ATB WestSprings, 202 – 917 85 St SW
  • May 26 at 8:30 am – noon; Mount Royal University, 4825 Mt Royal Gate SW
  • June 9 at 8:30 am – noon; ATB Rocky Ridge, 3000 – 11595 Rockyvalley Dr NW
  • June 16 at 8:30 am – noon; ATB Douglas Glen, 200 – 11488 24 St SE
  • June 30 at 8:30 am – noon; Green Calgary Association, 100 – 301 14 Street NW
  • May 5 at 9 am – noon: Green Calgary AGM and Environmental Celebration, Mount Pleasant Community Hall

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Pick up a basic booth kit at the office, set up the booth and host it (table and chair supplied by Green Calgary)
  • Share knowledge on CAWST and CAWST Wavemakers
  • Engage people in discussion on water and sanitation
  • Respond to questions on CAWST
  • Track and log volunteer hours with the CAWST volunteer coordinator

 

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Familiar with CAWST, able to give a brief intro on water and sanitation and how CAWST helps
  • Friendly personality and keen to work with young people
  • Passion to help CAWST spread the word about water & sanitation
  • Organized and reliable

We will provide orientation and a booth kit including informational materials and a short activity.

Department and Supervision: Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives


Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you would like to sign up to be a booth host, click here to commit to a shift. If you wish to be a booth host and would like to receive orientation first, please contact the Volunteer Program Coordinator, Tori D’Avella, at volunteers@cawst.org or 403-243-3285 ext 259.

If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form.

 

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers.

NextWorldNow Community Investments

NextWorldNow provides resources for projects defined by local leaders to improve the lives and well-being of the people in the community. NextWorldNow will offer at least one ten thousand dollar ($10,000) grant to a selected project. The fund invests are interested in many types of community programs: Civic Participation; Education; Effective Development; Environmental Mediation – Water, Sanitation, Deforestation; Health Care Access and Treatment; Human Rights; Peace and Human Security; Shelter; Smallholder Productivity and Food Security; Sustainable Markets/Livelihood.

Summer Festival Crew Member (multiple positions available with various shifts)

CAWST is looking for individuals interested in setting up, hosting, and taking down our spring and summer festival booth and activities, to raise awareness and understanding of the challenges and solutions to access to safe water and sanitation.

The Position: Summer Festival Crew Member

 Purpose of the Role:

To help set up, host, and take down our fun and engaging CAWST booth at:

Please note: shifts for each festival are available. You will not be expected to be at the booth the entire time listed above.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Attend a training at the CAWST office (timing TBD)
  • Set up an engaging activity (such as the Poo Toss game, make your own filter, or a photo booth) that informs and engages people on the challenges and solutions of water and sanitation crisis
  • Talk with the festival attendees about CAWST’s model of development and how CAWST is addressing the water and sanitation crisis
  • Share ways to get involved with CAWST and information on Wavemakers and encourage sign ups for our newsletter or membership
  • Share content for live Tweeting during the events
  • Take down the display
  • Track and log volunteer hours with the CAWST volunteer coordinator

Orientation and Training:

  • An hour-long orientation is required. Timing to be determined based on availability.

Skills and Qualifications:

  • Familiar with CAWST
  • Friendly personality and keen to work with all ages
  • Passion to help CAWST spread the word about water & sanitation
  • Organized and reliable
  • Willingness to lift heavy items
  • Preference given to those with previous experience
  • Ideally based in Calgary, Okotoks and surrounding area

Department and Supervision: Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives


Application:

If you are already a CAWST volunteer, and you wish to apply for this volunteer position, you can sign up for a shift or contact the Volunteer Program Coordinator, Tori D’Avella, at volunteers@cawst.org or 403-243-3285 ext 259. If you are new to CAWST, please complete the volunteer sign up form and we will email you to confirm.

In your email, please tell us:

  1. If and how you’ve been involved with us in the past
  2. Your general availability for training (1 – 2 hours)

 

Additional comments:

All CAWST volunteers are invited to participate in a 4-day training workshop of their choice after completion of 40 volunteer hours. CAWST welcomes volunteers searching for work experience, and is happy to provide letters of reference to interested volunteers. 

Paint It Blue: Sharing Water Knowledge Coast to Coast and Beyond

Paint It Blue is an annual campaign we run to spark action around World Water Day and to share water knowledge far and wide. With your help, we did just that.

Canada, we want to thank you for all your efforts to Paint It Blue for World Water Day!

Paint It Blue is an annual campaign we run to spark action around World Water Day and to share water knowledge far and wide. With your help, we did just that.


-Galleria Trees on Stephen Avenue Paints It Blue in Calgary, AB. Photo credit: @cccaswell

It is our second year running Paint It Blue and we’re delighted by the growth of water knowledge and water action taken across Canada. This year, 28 Canadian landmarks lit up with blue light from coast to coast. Even those who could not light up offered alternatives, like Proclamations of World Water Day from the City of Victoria and the City of Calgary. And some businesses who caught wind of the campaign took action of their own – Kaffeeklatsch developed a blue latte to raise funds for CAWST, and Urban Thrift painted their display blue by featuring blue clothing and Paint It Blue buttons.


-Team from CAWST WET Centre, Ethiopian Kale Heywet Church Development Program (EKHCDP), in Ethiopia, proudly wearing their Paint It Blue buttons.

CAWST had our annual World Water Day event, shining a light on the action of youth Wavemakers to solve water, sanitation and hygiene challenges. From selling phosphate-free soaps, to raising funds for First Nations water issues in Canada, to travelling to Oaxaca to install biosand filters, Wavemakers are having a positive impact in their communities and globally through their action projects. Some teams are building on their projects from past years to grow the capacity within their schools to take action on water challenges. A huge thanks goes out to our event sponsors, Repsol and TELUS Spark, who made it possible to hold this event! Speaking of Paint It Blue buttons, we nearly ran out this year due to the enthusiasm of businesses and individuals to share them. Our volunteers took buttons all around Calgary to spread the word on water. Tal, our director of Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives, spread the enthusiasm globally, by taking buttons all the way to Ethiopia and sharing a piece of how we spread water knowledge in Canada with our clients. Tal shared a series of “follow the button” posts on social media that have inspired upcoming blog posts – stay tuned to learn more about how water knowledge is shared in Ethiopia by our local partners and WET Centre. 
CAWST was also invited to a variety of other World Water Day events. Inspired by Paint It Blue, SAIT held a new World Water Day event for students and faculty with CAWST as a speaker, and a display from Plastic Free YYC. We were also delighted to participate in YEG World Water Day, which featured speakers like Bob Sandford and many more.

 

Do you have the post-World Water Day blues?


-Arbour Lake School displays their action project at our World Water Day event at TELUS Spark.

Water World Water Day may be over, but we are always open to Painting It Blue! Contact us to get involved, discuss next year’s campaign or book a lunch and learn to share water knowledge within your organization or community.

You can also relive the good times by checking out our photo albums on Facebook. Did you get your blue-tiful picture taken at our photo booth? Find your photo, tag yourself and share it with your friends with the hashtags #WorldWaterDay and #PaintItBlue!

 

 


-Paint It Blue buttons and enthusiasm spread far and wide, including to our WET Centre partners in Ethiopia and people all along the way. We even reached new supporters as far away as Cork, in Ireland, who Painted It Blue for World Water Day!


Tori D’Avella is a Public Engagement Officer on the Public Engagement & Donor Initiatives. This is Tori’s first time leading the project team working on CAWST’s Paint It Blue campaign, which reached over 230,000 impressions on social media alone. She is passionate about inter-organizational partnership and systems change, which is the subject of the MSc she is currently pursuing. Tori assures us that her favourite colour is blue.

WASH Skills Development Organization Celebrates its Official Launch

WASH SDO, CAWST’s WET (Water Expertise and Training) Centre in Cambodia, has a new name, website and board of directors – and is officially launching with new energy!

They have a new name, new website, and new board of directors—but they’re still CAWST’s favorite team of Cambodian WASH professionals!


-WASH SDO Launch Celebration

This week, CAWST’s Naomi Mahaffy had the privilege of attending the official launch of WASH Skills Development Organization (WASH SDO) in Cambodia. CAWST has worked closely with this team since 2012. We are delighted to see how their skills, network, and impact continue to grow.

Six years ago, CAWST and Church World Services Cambodia (CWS) partnered to establish the WASH Training Resource Centre (WASH TRC) in Pnom Penh. With support from CAWST, the team at WASH TRC has created, adapted, and delivered numerous training and consulting services in Cambodia. These services help local governmental and nongovernmental organizations build the knowledge and skills required to implement effective water and sanitation programs in rural Cambodia. Last year, with support from WaterAid Cambodia, the team of trainers from WASH TRC decided to register as an independent local organization called WASH SDO.

Today’s launch is a celebration of the many years of work WASH SDO has committed to establish itself as a local organization with a strong network of partners and clients,” said Naomi. “WASH SDO staff created a fun and informative event. Their materials and presentations clearly explained the services they offer and the expertise they can provide. I was inspired by hearing local government and NGO staff share stories of how WASH SDO’s training and consulting services helped them implement better programs.

Naomi sits on WASH SDO’s board of directors, along with representatives from WaterAid, CWS, the World Health Organization, and two local organizations. As WASH SDO expands its services in Cambodia, CAWST will continue to support the team with training material development, technical information, and competency development.

Congratulations to WASH SDO on a successful launch! We wish you many more successes as you build the skills of WASH practitioners in Cambodia.

:  Follow WASH SDO on Facebook to stay up to date on the WET Centre’s exciting new programs, endeavours and achievements.


Naomi Mahaffy, BSC, MASC, is a Global Learning Advisor on the Training & Consulting team at CAWST. Her favourite Cambodian dish is Kuy teav, a delicious rice noodle soup.

CAWST in the News: Cisco

Coinciding with World Water Day, CISCO published an article about how technology can accelerate sustainable access to safe water.

CALGARY, March 23, 2018 — Coinciding with World Water Day, Cisco published an article on their Corporate Social Responsibility blog about how technology can accelerate sustainable access to safe water.

From their article “How Technology Can Accelerate Sustainable Access to Safe Water”:

We know the Sustainable Development Goals are bold, ambitious targets. We also know that technology can play a critical role in achieving these goals.
Organizations such as Akvo Foundation, Sweet Sense, and CAWST demonstrate the impact that technology can have in addressing water and sanitation challenges, and in helping realize SDG 6: to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

CAWST is grateful to be funded the CISCO Foundation, supporting us to increase the efficiency and quality of our programs, reduce overall costs, and enable greater reach and scale of WASH initiatives around the world.

Canada Paints It Blue for World Water Day

CAWST, the Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, is coordinating landmarks from coast to coast in Canada to Paint it Blue for World Water Day. Together we will spark action for safe water for all.

MEDIA RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Canada Paints It Blue for World Water Day

 

March 16, 2017

All across Canada, landmarks will Paint It Blue in honor of World Water Day to inspire and spark action on water issues. CAWST, the Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, a Canadian charity and licensed engineering firm, helps coordinate landmarks to shine a (blue) light on the global water crisis we face. This year, the campaign Paints It Blue from coast to coast, from Vancouver, BC all the way to St John’s, Newfoundland. The blue light acknowledges the importance of access to safe drinking water for everyone on the planet and the efforts many organizations and governments are taking to find solutions to our water challenges.

Look for the beautiful blue displays of buildings and landmarks near you!

Calgary:

  • Calgary Tower
  • Galleria Trees on Stephen Avenue
  • TELUS Spark
  • ATB Lights at McMahon Stadium
  • SAIT MacPhail School of Energy

Edmonton:

  • High Level Bridge
  • ATB Place
  • Alberta Legislature

Vancouver:

  • BC Place
  • Canada Place Sails of Light
  • Science World
  • Vancouver City Hall
  • Vancouver Lookout
  • Vancouver Convention Centre Cauldron Arms

Toronto:

  • 3D Toronto Sign

And Many More:

  • Niagara Falls Illumination Board, ON
  • Kipnes Lantern at National Arts Centre – Ottawa, ON
  • Alpine Club of Canada Hostelling International – Canmore, AB
  • River Park Glen – Fort McMurray, AB
  • Peace Bridge – Fort Erie and Buffalo
  • Fredericton City Hall, NB
  • Halifax City Hall, NS
  • Lethbridge City Hall, AB
  • St John’s City Hall, NL
  • Welland Bridge 13, ON
  • Lumel Studios – Whitehorse, YK

In addition to coordinating landmarks across Canada to Paint It Blue, CAWST is engaging businesses and individuals to take action. From blue lattes, to clothing drives, and educational events, Canadians are taking action on water challenges and solutions.

World Water Day is observed by the United Nations to raise awareness about the lack of safe, clean water for millions around the world. Nearly 1 in 3 people worldwide lack safe, readily available water at home.


About CAWST

CAWST is a Canadian charity and licensed engineering firm. We address the global need for safe drinking water and sanitation by building local knowledge and skills on household solutions people can implement themselves. Since 2001, CAWST and our clients have reached 15.4 million people globally with better water or sanitation.


Media inquiries

Naomi Robinson
Public Engagement Officer
1.403.243.3285 ext. 253

Global WASH Advisor

Are you a WASH specialist with a passion for training? CAWST is not like other organizations, and this position is not like others. We are looking for a unique combination of skills, experience and interests including water and sanitation, international development, and capacity development of WASH practitioners. You believe that everybody can learn, and you love training and supporting others to develop their WASH knowledge and skills. You are enterprising, resourceful, and motivated. You have an insatiable curiosity and are deeply committed to applying your skills and experience to making the world a better place.

Are you a WASH specialist with a passion for training? CAWST is not like other organizations, and this position is not like others. We are looking for a unique combination of skills, experience and interests including water and sanitation, international development, and capacity development of WASH practitioners. You believe that everybody can learn, and you love training and supporting others to develop their WASH knowledge and skills. You are enterprising, resourceful, and motivated. You have an insatiable curiosity and are deeply committed to applying your skills and experience to making the world a better place.

The Position: Global WASH Advisor

Reports to: Directors of Training and Consulting

Type: Full time, permanent

Location: The position is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. International travel is typically four trips per year. Up to 50% of your time will be spent overseas

Position start date: As soon as possible

Application Due Date: Review of applications will begin on March 26, 2018 and will continue to be accepted until the position is filled

Compensation: Salary will be discussed in the personal interview so please include salary expectations in your cover letter

Position Summary

The Global WASH Advisor (GWA) is part of CAWST’s Training & Consulting team. In this position you will work directly with client organizations to increase their capacity to start, strengthen and grow their WASH programs. As a GWA, you will be responsible for providing professional technical training and ongoing consulting support to help our clients overcome technical and implementation challenges.

You will also work with Water Expertise and Training (WET) Centres and Training Organizations to strengthen their capacity development services.

Each GWA is assigned responsibility for managing relationships and CAWST service provision in several countries, and developing and executing on their country and regional plans.

You will work closely with all CAWST departments, and in particular with the Research & Learning, and the Virtual Services cross-departmental regional teams.


The Role

Specific Areas of Responsibility 

1. Training, Coaching, and Mentoring

  • Use your expertise and experience to train clients, WET Centres and Training Organizations using a variety of methods including workshops, apprenticing, and mentoring. Your goal will be to:
    • Transfer skills and knowledge so practitioners take effective action, resulting in safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene
    • Develop the capability of practitioners of different skill levels in a variety of roles. Prepare and deliver training workshops and learning exchanges
    • Adapt CAWST workshops and resources to the context and needs of clients
    • Develop and maintain strong client relationships
    • Provide online and face-to-face to support to clients, to help them solve problems and overcome barriers to implementation

 

2. Developing Capacity of Local Partners

  • Work with local partners to develop their skills and capabilities, so they can replicate CAWST’s capacity development services for client organizations
  • Identify new local partner organizations s within your region or countries of responsibility.  Develop relationships and explore opportunities to collaborate
  • Work with local partners to develop strategy and plans, and seek funding
  • Act as project manager, as appropriate, taking responsibility for the capacity development process with the local partner

 

3. Research, Learning, and Communications

  • Actively participate in personal and organizational professional development, in particular in CAWST’s semi-annual Learning Exchanges (January and June)
  • Collaborate with our Research and Learning team to develop, maintain and update education materials, and act as subject matter expert, contributing your skills and knowledge as required
  • Collect images, case studies, stories, and testimonies from CAWST’s work overseas
  • Gather information and provide input to other CAWST teams to guide the development of appropriate training, consulting services, and tools for our clients
  • Provide and review content to ensure materials meet the needs of practitioners, and to ensure technical accuracy
  • Support CAWST’s role in research projects

 

4. Operations Planning and Reporting

  • Develop and execute country and regional strategies and plans, including definition of activities, targets, and budgets
  • Understand and contribute to CAWST’s operations, business cycle, and financial stewardship

 

5. Business/Client Development and Fund Development

  • Research and prepare country and regional strategies.
  • Develop strong understanding of country contexts, client organizations, and key water and sanitation issues
  • Identify potential training, networking and client support opportunities
  • Seek funding to support your operations plan, working closely with the fund development team
  • Contribute to funding proposals that include programs in your region, or area of expertise
  • Develop relationships with potential funders in your countries of responsibility

 

6. Governance

  • Participate in the development of CAWST’s strategic plans, including development of short and long-range performance objectives
  • Assist in the distribution and collection of CAWST’s annual client survey, and contribute as needed to the results analysis

 

Any other duties and responsibilities as directed by the Directors of Training and Consulting.


The Person

This important role requires an energetic person who has a special combination of skills and attributes.

Education

  • Bachelor’s or graduate degree in engineering, sciences, public health or other relevant discipline

 

Experience

  • Minimum 3-5 years’ work experience implementing WASH programs in the international development context
  • Minimum three years’ experience delivering WASH training, and WASH related capacity development services
  • Demonstrated track record of commitment to poverty alleviation through water, sanitation and hygiene

 

Skills and Attributes

  • Excellent WASH technical knowledge and significant experience implementing projects in the following:
    • Household water treatment
    • Sanitation and excreta management
    • Hygiene or health promotion and behaviour change
    • Water supply and treatment
  • Excellent written and verbal communications, with the ability to target different and cross-cultural audiences to build rapport, engage, and motivate individuals
  • Able to create a participatory learning environment and use a range of cross-cultural, participatory training, and facilitation methods
  • Entrepreneurial, innovative, and open to change
  • Problem solver, resourceful, and able to troubleshoot technical problems quickly and effectively
  • Strategic and proactive in coordination and project management
  • Service-oriented and consistently seeks to provide a high level of professional service to clients and colleagues
  • Able to handle multiple tasks and balance priorities with various projects and stakeholders
  • Easily and quickly establishes credibility with clients and other stakeholders
  • Professional and diplomatic approach; works well independently, within teams, and across teams
  • Enjoys international travel, able to work in challenging situations in different cultures, and easily adapts to different contexts
  • Proficient with Windows-based computer programs, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint

 

Language

  • Fluent written and spoken English required
  • Fluent written and spoken Spanish and/or French is an asset

To Apply

Please apply by sending your cover letter, resume, and completed questionnaire to cawstHR@cawst.org.  Review of applications will begin on March 26, 2018 and will continue to be accepted until the position is filled.

Please note: Only resumes from candidates eligible to work in Canada will be reviewed; and only those applicants granted an interview will be contacted. No phone calls, please.

 

Questionnaire

Please answer all questions to the best of your ability. Be as specific as possible and try to keep each answer under half a page.

  1. What has motivated you to consider working at CAWST?
  2. What excites you the most about this role?
  3. What is your philosophy on education and training?  Please support with an example of experience you have had in training delivery and your role in the delivery.
  4. What was one of the most difficult problems you have faced in an international development context, how did you handle it, and what was the outcome?
  5. Of your technical experience, what do you believe is most relevant to the Global WASH Advisor role with CAWST?
  6. What are your long-term career goals and aspirations? Where do you see yourself in five years?

Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 15.4 million people get better water or sanitation.

The Financial Post newspaper named CAWST one of the Top 25 Charities in Canada in 2015. Read the article.

Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.

Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions, and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

“I Can Now Walk with My Head Up”

This is the inspiring story of Florence, who thanks to water education, has become an agent of change in her community.

Through education, training and sheer determination, Florence recast her role in life. She built a better, healthy future for herself and her family, and she is transforming the lives of people in multiple communities. As Florence’s story demonstrates, educating women is key to economic empowerment and healthy communities.

CAWST provides training and consulting support to organizations that place women and water at the centre of breaking the cycle of poverty, by combining technology and capacity development. We train organizations like Global Women’s Water Initiative (GWWI), who in turn trained Florence.

Education offers the greatest opportunity to effect sustainable change, and to do so at the scale needed.


Watch Florence’s Story: A Tale of Transformation

I can now walk with my head up. Women can come to me. Schools, teachers can come to me.
-Florence, Community WASH Educator

 

Coffee with CAWST: Tal Woolsey

One of our longest-standing staff members, some say Tal is the heart of CAWST. Tal is currently transitioning from a role as International Technical Advisor to Director of Public Engagement and Donor Initiatives. No matter where Tal resides in CAWST, he will always believe in people’s potential. Read on to learn more about this quirky and energetic early bird.

Safety Never Takes a Holiday

Current Role: Director of Public Engagement & Donor Initiatives (PEDI)

What fills your days? 

Right now? Confusion.

Given the dynamic nature of CAWST, the clarity of the position of Director of PEDI is currently nebulous.
What I mean by this is that I still have a role as an International Technical Advisor, and I have to complete that role in both Zambia and Ethiopia before I can fully engage in the directorship of PEDI activities.

It’s an exciting time – but there’s always a fine line between excitement and fear… and I’m not sure which side of the line I’m on right now.

What is the best part of your day?

Being with the PEDI staff, and watching their creativity blossom. It encourages me because I don’t consider myself that creative. So, being surrounded by creative people fuels me. Not that I’m more creative because of it, but I feel more confident that we will achieve what we intend through our PEDI pursuits.
Those are the highlights of my day.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

A welder. Because my father was a welder. I actually did learn to weld. I didn’t enjoy it.

What is a fun fact about you that most people don’t know?

I am an amputee.
When I was a kid, I was in a motorcycle accident and ended up having two toes amputated on my right foot. So this is a warning to all motocross enthusiast to always wear protective gear. I wasn’t wearing riding boots; if I had been, they might have saved the day. Or, at the very least – my toes.

There’s my fun fact. Safety never takes a holiday.

What brought you to CAWST?

After working in Haiti for a number of years, I knew I was going to leave. I also knew I was meant to remain in this field. By this point I had a three-year relationship with CAWST. I liked what CAWST did. I liked their vision and mission.
Camille [our founder] was visiting Haiti and she asked me what I was going to do after I left Haiti. I told her I was going to work with her. She said “When you get back to Canada, come and see me”.

What is it about water that speaks to you?

Nothing.
I’ve never viewed my role as having much to do with water. It has to do with people. Relationships. Helping people reach their potential and achieve what they’re striving to achieve.

Where is your favourite place to travel?

Vancouver Island. I feel blessed that I’ve been able to travel all over the world.
But when people ask me that question – what’s your favourite place on the planet – it’s still Vancouver Island. We are blessed here in Canada to have a place like that. We’ve got many of them. Most of my favourite places on the planet are in Canada. I’m lucky.

What will be different about CAWST in 10 years?

The dreamer in me believes that CAWST won’t be needed in 10 years. The pragmatist in me knows that there will still be a role for CAWST.
My hope is that CAWST would not only be playing a leadership role in the countries that we work in, but also within the developed world as well. Helping those of us that are blessed beyond all measure to understand that that comes with inherent responsibility.

What surprises you most in this line of work?

How committed people are to changing the world. From those that are working to transform their communities – and work tirelessly at that transformation. To those in the North American or Canadian context that are also just as willing to work tirelessly to change the world.

What’s one of your greatest gifts?

I believe in people.

Within my role – or the role I’m leaving as an International Technical Advisor – I look for individuals that have a desire to transform their communities. I’m able to walk alongside them and help them to develop the skills that will lead them to being the transformation agents they want to be.
It’s not always easy to see the diamond… but that’s my gift. I believe anyone can learn and grow to their fullest potential.

Want to see Tal in action? Check out Wash That Sand.

Coffee with CAWST  is a blog series, where we have coffee and conversation with some of the outstanding people behind CAWST. Please let us know what you think, ask questions and stay tuned for more!

Global Learning Advisor

Do you want to support clients to provide effective training on water, sanitation, and hygiene? Are you looking for a new challenge and a novel way to apply your instructional design, training, and facilitation skills? We are looking for an exceptional individual with experience in training, instructional design, water, and sanitation, to develop the capacity of our clients globally.

Do you want to support clients to provide effective training on water, sanitation, and hygiene? Are you looking for a new challenge and a novel way to apply your instructional design, training, and facilitation skills? We are looking for an exceptional individual with experience in training, instructional design, water, and sanitation, to build the capacity of our clients globally.

The Position: Global Learning Advisor.

Reports to: Directors of Training and Consulting.

Type: Full time, permanent.

Location: The position is based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. International travel is typically four trips per year. Up to 50% of your time will be spent overseas.

Compensation: Salary will be discussed in the personal interview. Please include salary expectations in your cover letter.

Position start date: As soon as possible.

Application Due Date: We will review applications starting March 26th, 2018. Applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled. Only resumes of applicants who are legally permitted to work in Canada will be reviewed.

 

Position Summary

The Global Learning Advisor is part of CAWST’s Training and Consulting team. In this position, you will work directly with clients and staff to increase their capacity to effectively design, develop, deliver, and evaluate WASH training. You will support trainers to improve their skills through a competency development process and work with clients to co-develop training materials. You will feedback these experiences to our Research & Learning and our Virtual Services teams, to support them in the design of relevant and timely online and face-to-face training materials.

This is a demanding role that requires a creative, motivated, and enthusiastic individual who wants to contribute to building the capacity of WASH educators globally. The ideal candidate will have a proven track record of instructional design, with a focus on content for global audiences, as well as extensive experience developing and delivering workshops or courses for participants from low-income countries.


Specific Areas of Responsibility

  1. Training, Coaching, and Mentoring (40%)
  • Train partners, clients and staff using a variety of methods including workshops, mentoring, peer support, and apprenticeship to effectively:
    • deliver workshops on WASH
    • design workshops on WASH
    • adapt or customize content for a specific client context
  • Develop and maintain strong client relationships, building and sustaining credibility with your clients and potential clients.
  • Support CAWST staff to effectively deliver online and face-to-face training in WASH.
  • Contribute to the delivery of our semi-annual Learning Exchanges to support professional development, knowledge sharing, and feedback within CAWST and client networks.
  • Prepare and deliver webinars, online courses, and training workshops.

 

  1. Instructional Design (20%)
  • Support the design, development, evaluation, and improvement of CAWST’s education and training materials.
  • Develop competency frameworks for different roles in the WASH sector.
  • Develop online and face-to-face training programs for effective knowledge transfer that results in action leading to safe water and sanitation.
  • Develop digital learning tools suitable for clients in low-income countries.

 

  1. Developing Capacity of Local Partners (20%)
  • Work with local partner organizations to build their skills and capabilities so they can replicate CAWST’s capacity development services for client organizations.
  • Identify potential new local partner organizations within the region or countries of responsibility.
  • Work together with local partner organizations to develop strategy and plans, and seek funding for their development.
  • Act as project manager, as appropriate, and take responsibility for the capacity development process with the local partner.

 

  1. Business Development (15% of the time)
  • Research and prepare country and regional strategies.
  • Develop a strong understanding of country contexts, client organizations, and key water and sanitation issues.
  • Identify potential training, networking, and client support opportunities.
  • Seek funding to support your operations plan, working closely with the Fund Development team.
  • Contribute to funding proposals that include programs in your region or area of expertise.
  • Develop relationships with potential funders in your countries of responsibility.

 

  1. Operations Planning, Reporting (~5% of the time)
  • Develop and execute strategies and plans to develop leading, water, sanitation, and hygiene education and training programs.
  • Understand and contribute as appropriate to CAWST’s operations and business services cycle (e.g., department operations planning, monthly operations reports, budget reconciliations, timesheets, and trip reports).

Any other duties and responsibilities as may be required.

 

Education

  • A bachelor’s or graduate degree in instructional design, education, adult education, or equivalent.
  • Preference given to those with a second degree, diploma, or equivalent training in engineering, science, or public health.
  • Certified Training and Development Practitioner (CTDP) designation is an asset.

 

Experience

Ideal candidates have the following experience:

  • International development and education (2-5 years) with focus on at least one of the following areas: capacity development, participatory training, instructional design, effective facilitation skills, mentoring, and coaching.
  • Designing, developing, delivering, and evaluating participatory adult learning workshops or courses.
  • Working in water, sanitation, and hygiene sector in low-income countries is an asset.
  • Experience designing and delivering online training is an asset.

 

Skills and Attributes

You are well suited for this role if you are:

  • Passionate about safe water and sanitation, and your values align with CAWST’s mission and vision.
  • Able to communicate complex ideas in simple and engaging ways.
  • Able to think creatively about challenges, resolve issues, and seek support when necessary.
  • Innovative, flexible, and open to change.
  • Able to balance and manage your own workload according to established business priorities and timelines.
  • Professional and diplomatic; work well independently, within teams, and across teams.
  • Able to quickly establish credibility with others.
  • Proficient in MS Office (e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint).

 

Language

  • Excellent communications in English, written and verbal, with the ability to target a variety of cross-cultural audiences.
  • Fluent written and spoken Spanish and/or French is an asset.

 

To Apply

Please apply by sending your cover letter, resume, and completed questionnaire to cawstHR@cawst.org.  Review of applications will begin on March 19th, 2018. Applications will continue to be accepted until the position is filled. Only resumes from candidates legally permitted to work in Canada will be reviewed; and only those applicants granted an interview will be contacted. No phone calls, please.

 

Questionnaire

Please answer all questions to the best of your ability. Be as specific as possible and try to keep each answer under half a page.

  1. What has motivated you to consider working at CAWST?
  2. What excites you most about this particular role at CAWST?
  3. What is your philosophy on education and training? Please support your answer with an example you have of developing and delivering face-to-face training, preferably for an audience in a low-income country.
  4. What are your long-term career goals and aspirations? Where do you see yourself in five years?

Organizational Background

CAWST is a Canadian charity that focuses on the principle that safe water and basic sanitation are fundamentals necessary to empower the world’s poorest people and break the cycle of poverty. CAWST transfers knowledge and skills to organizations and individuals in low- and middle-income countries through education, training, and consulting services. Since 2001, CAWST’s global client network, including governments, community-based charitable organizations, local enterprises, international development agencies, and educational institutions, has helped 15.4 million people get better water or sanitation.

  • Our vision is a world where people have the opportunity to succeed because their basic water and sanitation needs have been met.
  • Our mission is to provide technical training and consulting, and to act as a centre of expertise in water and sanitation for the poor in developing countries.

CAWST values equitable opportunities, sustainable solutions, and collaborative and inclusive processes. We recognize and accept differences in cultural, religious and political processes.

The Financial Post newspaper named CAWST one of the Top 23 Charities in Canada in 2017. Read the article.